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Welcome

Dear residents and friends,

 

I deeply appreciate your support and confidence and I look forward to an ongoing dialogue with you on the many issues, challenges and opportunities we'll face together as a community here in Ward 22, St. Paul's and as a city.

 

I'm advocating for a more thoughtful, creative and responsible new approach for city council. I want council to engage our city's residents with an inspiring plan and make informed decisions that are based on evidence, community consultation and the merits of arguments - rather than ideology or left or right-wing partisanship.

 

My staff and I are here to assist you with any concerns or questions you may have. We're also working every day to improve our local neighbourhoods- along with supporting the many valued services Torontonians rely on every day. You are always welcome to contact me at 416-392-7906 or by email at councillor_matlow@toronto.ca.

 

Sincerely,

 

 

 

Josh

Latest Videos

Councillor Matlow spoke on options for the Scarborough Subway, March 31, 2016.

Councillor Matlow spoke on tenant issues related to the Residential Tenancies Act, December 18 2013.

It's Time to Move Forward Now with an Honest and Fact-Based Transit Plan to Serve Scarborough Residents

Dear Residents,

A bad deal for Scarborough residents keeps getting worse. The cost of the 1-stop subway proposal has risen to $3.346 billion, a 50% increase from when the project was first announced in early 2016. As the cost is going up, Staff are projecting that fewer people will actually want to use the new line. The new report states that the subway will only attract 2,300 new daily riders. That means that the City would be paying approximately $1.45 million for every new rider that the stop gains.

The competing plans that will be debated at Council next week are the same as when I wrote to you about it in a newsletter last July. A 1-stop subway to the Scarborough Town Centre (STC), as shown below:



Or, for approximately the same City funding, we can choose instead to build 2 LRT lines with 24 stops. One line would have 7 stops using the existing RT corridor to link STC and Centennial College to Kennedy Station. This project is part of the signed Metrolinx Master Agreement, and would be mostly funded by the provincial government. Then, with money saved by moving forward now with the approved LRT, Council could fund a new 17-stop extension of the Eglinton Crosstown through Kennedy, serving Kingston Rd, UofT Scarborough, and several neighbourhoods in between.



I have included this picture of the proposed Centennial College station as a reminder that the 7-stop LRT will go through its own corridor on trains that have the same top speed as a subway (80 km/h).



Unfortunately, the Mayor and some others have declared a "war" over this issue to justify the unjustifiable. They have falsely stated that those wanting a larger network of LRTs for Scarborough have delayed the process.

In fact, providing rapid transit to Scarborough has only been delayed by Council's flip flop from a fully-funded LRT to a 3-stop and then 1-stop subway. The changing and uncertain subway costs and plans are the reason the issue keeps coming back to Council. Assertions otherwise are disingenuous.

Another specious argument put forward by 1-stop subway proponents is that only a subway stop will stimulate economic development at STC. That is a falsely exclusive causal relationship. While a subway stop could help support growth at STC, so would an LRT line. The LRT would actually provide 2 stops in the projected growth precinct. That's one of the reasons why our Chief Planner previously stated that an LRT, rather than a subway, would better stimulate economic development, while also serving more low-income residents as well as students:


(If you are unable to access the video by clicking on the above picture, you can access it through this link)


Asking for the Facts

I have submitted several questions regarding transit options for Scarborough that need to be clarified before Council votes next week. It is very concerning that, at a council meeting last July, City Council may have been falsely led to believe that the LRT would take longer to build than it actually would. In addition, there are several basic questions remaining with regard to the 1-stop subway proposal's funding and ridership. Regardless of what transit plan Council chooses, it is important that the decision be made honestly and based on evidence rather than political interests.

I want Scarborough residents, along with all Torontonians, to have access to rapid transit to improve the quality of their lives.

I have included my full communication to the City Manager below for your review. It is also included in next week's City Council agenda:

March 21, 2017

City Manager's Office
11th Floor, East Tower, City Hall
100 Queen Street West
Toronto, ON M5H 2N2

Dear Mr. Wallace,

Questions Re: Transit Options for Scarborough

As you know, transit plans in Scarborough have gone through a number of iterations. A 7-stop, traffic-separated LRT was initially approved in 2007, and reconfirmed several times, including the "MOU Plan" between former Mayor Ford and Metrolinx, as shown in the March 31, 2011 Ontario government press release below:


Fig. 1


The project, along with 3 other LRT lines in Toronto, was reconfirmed on February 8, 2012 at a Special Meeting of Council.

The shift to a subway in Scarborough was first approved as a 3-stop subway in October of 2013 for $3.56 billion. The plan significantly changed on January 28, 2016 when Staff presented a 1-stop subway just to Scarborough Town Centre and a 17-stop eastern extension of the Eglinton Crosstown LRT for approximately the same funding as the previous 3-stop plan, as stated on page 3 of EX 11.5 – Scarborough Transit Planning Update:

"Initial estimates indicate it is possible to construct the extension of Line 2 and the Crosstown East for a similar order-of-magnitude cost and in a similar timeframe as the three-stop Scarborough Subway extension originally proposed."

Unfortunately, the estimated price of the subway, excluding financing and other costs, has risen by more than 50%, leaving the 17-stop Crosstown extension unfunded. At the upcoming Council meeting of March 28, 2017, Council will, for the first time, have an opportunity to decide whether to proceed with a 1-stop extension of the Bloor Danforth subway for $3.346 Billion as identified in EX 23.1 Next Steps on the Scarborough Subway Extension.

I am submitting the following questions as there are several significant matters pertaining to this item that require clarification before Council makes a decision on the future of transit in Scarborough.


Master Agreement

The Master Agreement between Metrolinx, the City of Toronto, and the TTC signed in 2012 stated that the Province would pay 100% of the capital costs associated with the Scarborough LRT as shown in the excerpt below from page 1 of Schedule G in the Master Agreement:


Fig. 2

Question: Is the Master Agreement between Metrolinx, the City of Toronto, and the TTC still valid?


Comparison

The business case analysis before Council only provides a relative comparison between two 1-stop subway options. 

Question: Has the City ever provided a business case analysis that directly compared the subway extension (3 or 1-stop version) with the 7-stop LRT in Scarborough?


Transit Project Construction Issues

On July 4, 2016 a briefing note produced by the TTC (Attachment 1) appeared on CP24 regarding the possibility of moving forward with a 7-stop LRT from Kennedy to Sheppard, serving the existing RT route along with Centennial College and Sheppard. The contents of the briefing note were cited numerous times by Staff and Councillors during the Council meeting of July 12, 2016. This briefing note has still not been publicly posted on the website of the TTC or the City of Toronto.

The briefing note makes a number of assertions regarding the construction of the 7-stop LRT that require clarification prior to the upcoming Council meeting.

First, the briefing note assumes that the start of LRT construction would have to wait until work on the Eglinton Crosstown was completed at Kennedy. However, as the excerpt below from an April 25, 2012 Metrolinx Board Report states, Metrolinx was explicitly planning to start at the north end of the line first to speed up construction time:


Fig. 3

Question: Was the City/TTC aware of new information that would prohibit starting to build the Scarborough LRT at the north end of the line to expedite the construction process?

Further, an excerpt from page 1 of the same 2012 Metrolinx Board Report, shown below, states that, at the time, the Eglinton Crosstown was expected to be completed in 2020 and the Scarborough LRT's completion date was 2019:


Fig. 4


While the completion dates have changed, these construction timelines required that work occur simultaneously at Kennedy Station to facilitate both projects. As depicted in the diagram below, the Eglinton Crosstown was to occupy the below-grade platform, while the Scarborough LRT would enter at-grade.


Fig. 5


The briefing note states that, as a result of the Eglinton Crosstown, the Scarborough LRT is "physically precluded" at Kennedy Station without mentioning that space below-grade would now be available for the Scarborough LRT platform, further improving the transfer to the Bloor-Danforth subway.

Question: Is the City/TTC aware of a reason why Metrolinx would not be able to construct platforms at Kennedy Station for both the Eglinton Crosstown and the Scarborough LRT, as was originally planned, but with the platform levels for the two projects switched?


Design Completion

There have been several concerning inconsistencies regarding the stated level of design completion for both the 7-stop Scarborough LRT and the 1-stop subway that require clarification before Council votes later this month.

During the Questions to Staff portion of the debate on EX 16.1 Developing Toronto's Transit Network Plan to 2031 at the July 12, 2016 Council meeting, Councillor Colle asks the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B, a question on the design completion status of the Scarborough LRT (scroll to the 4hr:45min mark of this video to view):

Councillor Colle: "There's been a lot of discussion around, uh, the percentage of where we are, at design for various projects, and we were told recently for the, call it, 2008-9-10 LRT that that's at about 5 per cent design? Or it was at that time? Is that a fair number?"

DCM: "So, um, Madam Speaker, ah, we've had some discussions as a follow-up. Some elements are at 5 and some are at 10 per cent. That was the information we got from Metrolinx the other day." 

The Deputy City Manager's response is seemingly at odds with the information presented by Metrolinx in the April 2012 Board Report included above (Fig. 3), which states that the longest portion of the line, between Kennedy and McCowan, was at 30% design completion.

Question: Did Metrolinx provide City Staff with information regarding the design completion status of the Scarborough LRT that contradicted their April 2012 Board Report, which claimed that the Kennedy to McCowan portion of the line was at the 30% design stage?

During the same question period, Councillor Colle asks a follow-up question about the design completion status of the 1-stop subway extension to Chief Project Manager for the Scarborough Subway Extension:

Councillor Colle: "And where would the subway be at design percentage of design completion? Around 5 (per cent) I think I've heard?"

Chief Project Manager: "Uh, we're currently at about 5 per cent, yes."

The Chief Project Manager's answer is reinforced by the chart below from the Staff report presented at the July 2016 Council meeting which states that the cost estimate provided was "developed at approximately 5% design": 


Fig. 6


A similar chart included in the Staff Report before Council later this month states that the 1-stop subway extension is still at 5% design.

Question: Given that there has been significant work done on the 1-stop Scarborough Subway Extension between July 2016 and March 2017, why is the project design status not moved beyond the 5% completion status cited in July 2016?


Funding Source Issues

There are a number of unanswered questions regarding funding sources for the 1-stop Scarborough Subway Extension that require clarification prior to Council voting on the issue.

The chart below provides a breakdown of the funding sources for the subway extension:


Fig. 7


Recommendation 6 in the Staff report that contains the above chart reads:

City Council request the Province of Ontario and Government of Canada confirm the sources of funding for the provincial and federal commitments to the Scarborough Subway Extension.

The wording of this recommendation raises a number of questions regarding the degree to which Council can depend on the funding amounts indicated, including:

Question: Has the City determined whether the $660 million committed by the previous federal government will be considered a separate contribution under the Build Canada Fund or will the City have to apply for the project under phase 2 of the Investing in Canada Fund, thereby decreasing the amount of funds available through this program? Will the contribution be escalated under either funding source?

Question: Has the City determined whether the provincial government has agreed to the $1.99 billion escalated contribution cited in Fig. 7? Has the provincial government agreed to transfer the full contribution all at once?


Travel Patterns

One of the proposed main advantages of the 1-stop subway extension, in comparison to the original LRT plan, is the elimination of the transfer at Kennedy station. The main benefit of the elimination of the transfer is a faster travel time downtown. As shown below in the map from the 2011 Transportation Tomorrow Survey, downtown travel accounts for 23% of all transit trips that begin in Scarborough: 


Fig. 8


Also evident in the map is that few riders from Scarborough get off the subway at destinations along the Bloor-Danforth line prior to the core.

As depicted in the rapid transit map below, it would appear that Scarborough commuters going downtown would have a much faster ride on SmartTrack/GO RER.


Fig. 9


Question:
How many riders during the AM peak and throughout the day are predicted to transfer to and from SmartTrack/GO RER at Kennedy Station?

Thank you for your attention in these matters. I look forward to responses that provide me and my colleagues with adequate time to review.


Sincerely,



Josh Matlow
Toronto City Councillor
Ward 22- St. Paul's

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------



Attachment 1



Briefing Note
Date: June 29, 2016

Issues Relating to Re-introduction of LRT Replacement for Line 3 (SRT)
Background
The original proposal - to replace the aging Line 3 Scarborough (SRT) with a 7-stop LRT line, extending to Sheppard Avenue East, is shown in the attached schematic.  This note summarises the primary tasks that would have to be undertaken in the event that the LRT solution was re-introduced. It is intended to assist in the event of any questions on this matter at City Council. It is important to note that these figures are estimates only and have been escalated, as noted below.

Discussion
The Environmental Assessment (EA) that was approved for the LRT project in 2010 must be updated, and formally amended, to address the following elements:

  1. Complete Redesign of the EA-Approved LRT Connection at Kennedy Station:  The most complex aspect of the conceptual design work on the LRT was the connection at Kennedy Station.  The recommended solution, shown in the attachments in plan and cross-section views, consisted of a large one-way LRT loop with the LRT station directly on top of the Eglinton Crosstown LRT (ECLRT) station. As Metrolinx’s plans for the ECLRT were finalised after Council approved subway technology in October 2013, they did not make any provision to protect for the LRT connection. This LRT connection is now physically precluded by the current ECLRT plans and an entirely new design would have to be developed.
  1. New Ridership Forecasts: As with the subway extension, ridership forecasts for the LRT would have to be updated using the City’s new forecasting model and reflect changes in the transit network in Scarborough.  This would include Smart Track/RER - with several options re service frequency and assumed level of fare integration – and options with and without the Sheppard East LRT and the easterly extension of the ECLRT.
  1. Review Potential Conflicts with GO/RER: A new design concept for a Lawrence LRT station must be developed that incorporates the current plans for a Smart Track Station at Lawrence Avenue.  In addition to identifying and resolving any issues at Lawrence Station, the LRT plans would have to reviewed with Metrolinx to  and identify and resolve any conflicts as the running structure is in the same corridor.
  1. Assess LRT Maintenance and Storage Facility (MSF) Options:  Subject to confirmation of a consistent maintenance/operating/ownership model for three LRT lines in Scarborough, an adequate location for MSF facility would have to be identified.  This could mean an interim solution (eg. a Bellamy yard was included in the original LRT EA) with a future consolidation at the previously planned Sheppard/Conlins yard.
  1. Closure of Line 3: finalise plans for the bus replacement service when Line 3 is shut down, including the associated temporary bus terminals and storage facility.
  1. Re-examine Bus Terminal Concepts at Stations: The previous number of bus bays to be confirmed for all stations.


vii)        Update Schedule and Capital Cost

viii)       EA Amendment Public Meeting: It is expected that at least one public meeting would be necessary as part of the process to amend the LRT EA.

Timing
From the point Council directs staff to proceed with an LRT solution, a very rough estimate would be that it would take approximately 12 to 18 months to present a revised plan to obtain Council and MOE approval. This is very much dependent upon the time required to identify, and obtain acceptance of, a new connection at Kennedy Station.

The construction at Kennedy Station is the key element on the critical path for the LRT and depending if the preferred design is above or below grade, construction could range from approximately 3.5 to 5 years.  If staff are directed to proceed in July 2016 and assuming construction cannot begin before the ECLRT work at Kennedy is completed in 2021, a quick preliminary evaluation suggests the LRT could be operational in early 2026 to late 2027.

Funding
With the change in technology, confirmation of contributions from funding partners may be required.

Order of Magnitude Comparison

The October 2013 Council report indicated the Province had announced $1.8B ($2010) for construction of SRT as LRT, to Sheppard. Of the $1.8B, the Province committed $1.48B ($2010) to the SSE.  As a minimum, staff believe the $1.8B should be the starting point, which would have to be updated through proper design to address the changes noted above.
The $1.48B has recently been reported as the total cost of a seven stop LRT.  To facilitate a high level cost comparison of the current subway estimate to the costs of an LRT at this time, the $1.8B was escalated to an end of 2025 opening (2% per year from 2011 to 2013 and 4% per year from 2014 to mid-2023), adding SRT Life Extension and SRT Shutdown service.

$1.8B escalated                                                      $2.7B
SRT Life Extension                                             .108
SRT Shutdown                                                  .171
Total                                                                 $2.979B
Prepared By
Rick Thompson, Chief Project Manager, Scarborough Subway Extension
416-590-6870

 

City Hall and Community Update for February 24, 2017

The Yonge & St. Clair Valentine's Day Fire at the Badminton & Racquet Club

The term “hero” is sometimes used too easily but I can’t think of a better word to describe the Fire, Police and EMS responders who attended to the 6-alarm fire at Yonge & St. Clair last week. For more than 24 hours, over 100 firefighters worked long, dangerous and grueling shifts to put out the blaze at the Badminton and Racquet Club; keeping the fire from spreading to residential buildings only feet away. In an amazing display of teamwork, Toronto Fire Services was joined by Police, EMS, the Office of Emergency Management, Toronto Hydro, Toronto Water, TTC, and others.

I would also like to commend Slate Asset Management for offering us the lobby of 55 St. Clair Ave West as a reception centre run by the Red Cross for displaced residents from buildings such as The Clairmont at 1430 Yonge Street and many others, as well as Tim Horton’s for staying open over night to provide refreshments. I'm also very appreciative of the many members of our community who offered a spare bedroom and other supports to their neighbours who were evacuated.

I have reached out to the President of the Badminton and Racquet Club, whose members lost a place that was very close to their hearts, to express our community’s sadness and strong support as they move forward. The B & R Club was also a building of historical importance to every resident of Toronto. An early example of of an adaptive reuse of a historic building, (it was a radial car barn (like Wychwood Barns) the club opened in 1925.

Impending Loss of 1955 Yonge Street

As many in the Davisville and Chaplin Estates neighbourhoods will already know, a developmentwas approved by a previous Council, in August 2010 at 1955 Yonge Street between Belsize and Millwood. Unfortunately, a property on this block (currently acting as the developer’s sales office) was not recognized as potentially having heritage value before the development was approved. City Heritage Staff has sadly informed me that there is nothing we can do to save the building.

For commercial reasons, the developer has not taken steps to move forward with construction until recently. The Buildings Department has informed me that the developer recently requested a demolition permit for this site and that they are legally bound to issue that permit shortly.

To help ensure that our community is able to protect more buildings of cultural and historical significance, City Planning is conducting a heritage audit of our community as part of theMidtown in Focus review of the Yonge-Eglinton Secondary Plan Area I requested. The results of this review are expected this year.

For your convenience, I have created an interactive map of all heritage properties located in Ward 22. Also, please click here to read the comments I wrote in my last update to you about the importance of Toronto's architectural heritage.

The Toronto Star Feature Series on the OMB and our Yonge-Eglinton Area

The Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) is an unaccountable, unelected and anti-democratic provincially-appointed body that has the final say over our city's planning decisions. The influence that the OMB has had on the Yonge-Eglinton area were featured in a well-written, informative series in the Toronto Star this past weekend.

As many of you know, I have been a long-time advocate of freeing Toronto from the OMB’s purview. While the Province has stopped short of eliminating the OMB altogether, there are a number of very positive reforms proposed in this Ministry of Municipal Affairs consultation document released last year that would significantly improve the planning process for Toronto, including:
  • Only allowing the OMB to hear appeals on the “validity of the decision” by council, limiting the OMB’s ability to hear appeals and completely overturn decisions
  • Preventing appeals of secondary plans, including Yonge and Eglinton which is now under review, for two years
  • Requiring the OMB to send “significant new information” arising from a hearing back to council for re-evaluation before rendering a decision
  • More actively promoting mediation to settle disputes, preventing adversarial hearings
  • Better training for OMB members, who are appointed by the Province
It is expected that the Province will move forward with legislation this year. I will be sure to update you as this important review progresses and new information is available.

City Staff to Defend Community at OMB Against Yonge & St. Clair Development

At Toronto and East York Community Council this week, my colleagues supported my motion to ensure the neighbourhood will be represented by City Planning and City Legal to oppose the inappropriate development proposal at 1417-1431 Yonge Street, just south of St. Clair. 

This file has had a long history and several iterations. On November 24, 2015, the applicant appealed City Planning’s refusal of their application for a 42-storey building to the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB). On August 2, 2016 at an OMB pre-hearing, the applicant informed the Board of a revised proposal for its site. Completely ignoring the community, the new proposal is for 46 storeys.

While I strongly agree that the Yonge & St. Clair area is in need of revitalization, this specific development proposal is inappropriate from functional and aesthetic perspectives. City Planning Staff have stated that the building is too tall and dense for the site, leaving very little room on the sidewalk and no additional public space, which is typical for a building of this size. As well, this condo would put added stress on the already overcrowded rear laneway. There is even concern that delivery vehicles, taxis, cars, and other vehicles accessing the proposed site could interfere with the St. Clair streetcar where it turns into the station.

The OMB hearing is scheduled for June of this year.

REMINDER: Let's Design Ward 22's Two New Park Spaces Together: Second Public Meeting

In early December 2016, I held an initial public meeting to gather residents' feedback on potential designs and uses for our two new parks on Manor Road East that we fought for together (the former Glebe Manor Lawn Bowling Club site and the corner of Manor Road and Forman Avenue). Since that meeting, the project design consultant has been busy developing design concepts based on that feedback and will be ready to share these drawings with the community shortly.

Please join me and your neighbours on Monday, February 27 to review and comment upon these concept designs for our two new parks! The meeting will be held at 6:30pm in the newly renovated sanctuary at Manor Road United Church (adjacent to one of our new park spaces at 240 Manor Road East). City of Toronto Parks staff will also be in attendance.

Independent Toronto Airspace Noise Review Public Meeting

In early 2012, NAV Canada changed the flight patterns of aircraft approaching and leaving Toronto Pearson International Airport. Many residents have contacted me and reported disturbances from increased air traffic noise including during overnight hours. Some have described the noise as living under an "air super-highway" and find the volume and frequency of flights intolerable.

I brought a motion to City Council to have City of Toronto officials meet with representatives from NAV Canada, the federal Ministry of Transportation, and other relevant bodies to find a less intrusive flight path that respects the needs of Toronto residents to live without excessive noise pollution. I continue to work together with the Toronto Aviation Noise Group (TANG) to advocate for the Federal government to address these concerns directly.

Next month, there will be an opportunity for you to have your voice heard on this issue. HELIOS, the UK-based aviation consulting company hired by NAV CANADA to conduct the independent Toronto Airspace Review, has scheduled the next round of public consultation meetings for early March.

The meeting date with the location closest to most mid-town Toronto residents is:

Saturday, March 4, 2017
10:30am to 12:30pm
Novotel North York
3 Park Home Avenue
North York
M2N 6L3

For more information, please click here.

Time for Torontonians to Get Ready to Register for Spring/Summer Recreation Programs

The City of Toronto offers recreation programs for all ages, skill levels and interests. Registration for spring and summer general programs, spring skating and swimming, and summer camps begins in two weeks. 

Registration dates
Registration is by district and starts at 7am on each date:
Etobicoke York: Saturday, March 4
Scarborough: Sunday, March 5 
North York: Tuesday, March 7 
Toronto and East York: Wednesday, March 8

Residents should visit http://www.toronto.ca/torontofun before registration day to build wish lists (program titles and bar codes) and have a few options ready in case they don’t get their first choice.

Those who want to register for programs will need to set up an account. Residents can call 416-338-4386, email  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or speak with staff at a City community centre to get a family number and a client number.

Parks, Forestry and Recreation will offer extended customer service call centre hours on March 1, 2, 3 and 6 from 7:30am to 6:30pm to assist with account information and answer questions about registration for spring/summer programs.


Welcome Policy yearly credit
The Welcome Policy credit can be used to register for City recreation programs. People receiving social assistance (Ontario Works) and living in Toronto are pre-approved to receive this credit and should speak to their caseworker. You can visit http://www.toronto.ca/wp for more information about the yearly credit.

Free programs
Many community centres offer free recreation programs including leisure swimming and skating, and drop-in programs for children, youth and older adults. More information about free and low-cost programming options is available here.

Older adult discounts
Older adults (60 plus years) who register for adult recreation programs receive a 50 per cent discount off the regular price of those programs.

Access to Art Programs and Workshops - Seniors Arts Engagement Program

The AGO invites visitors of all abilities to experience our collections in an inclusive and welcoming environment.

Make the AGO yours and discover your creativity!
  • Creativity is proven to support emotional well-being
  • Creativity reinforces the brain cells responsible for memory
  • Creativity cultivates a positive approach to life that enhances the immune system
  • Creativity promotes social interactions that help combat depression

Seniors Community Grant Program

The Seniors Community Grant Program, the first grant program in Ontario dedicated solely to seniors, is designed to give our elder population more opportunities to participate in their communities by providing funding to not-for-profit community groups for projects that encourage greater social inclusion, volunteerism and community engagement for seniors.

This grant program will make $2 million available for projects across Ontario that will help more seniors become socially engaged and feel part of their communities. Grants range from $1000 to $8000.

For your convenience, here are the program guidelines and application form.

For more information:
Applications will be accepted between November 25, 2016 and March 3, 2017.

Projects must not start prior to June 15, 2017 and be completed by March 31, 2018.

New Green Bins Arrive in Ward 22 Soon

The City continues to phase in delivery of the new Green Bins and the neighbourhoods in the northern part of District 3, east of Yonge Street and west of Victoria Park Avenue, will start receiving their new bins beginning March 9. It will take about three months to complete this distribution. The City will deliver to one collection route per day, which represents approximately 1,500 households. On the same day that residents get their new Green Bin, the old one will be taken away and recycled. If collection crews miss removing your old bin that day, set it out EMPTY on your next collection cycle and it will be picked up then (those who miss this second opportunity may contact 311 to arrange removal).

Here are some of the New Green Bin's key features:
  • It is animal-resistant so it can be stored outside or placed at the curb the night before collection with the lid in the locked position
  • It is larger and can hold more organics; plus, it meets automated collection requirements
  • Set out is important. Place the bin with the dial in the locked position with the arrows on the top of the lid facing the street to receive collection and please remember to leave space (0.5 metres) between bins for automated collection
More tips on using your new bin will be delivered with the bin. It is important to start using your new bin on your next collection day, as the City will no longer be able to collect from the old one.

You can check the bin delivery progress in our area on the City's Solid Waste Management webpage at www.toronto.ca/greenbin. These maps are updated weekly and are a useful tool to refer to if you have inquiries on the delivery status of the new Green Bins.

For questions or concerns about your new Green Bin, or to order an additional one, please contact 311.

Updated Ward 22 Development Page

To ensure you are informed and engaged about development proposals being proposed for sites near your neighbourhood, I've created an interactive webpage

My webpage listing all the proposed developments in Ward 22 has recently been updated to reflect current development applications and, as always, contains locations, staff reports and public meeting notices. Additionally, the map now shows the boundaries of the Urban Growth Centre surrounding Yonge and Eglinton, as well as the designated Avenues (portions of Eglinton Avenue West, St. Clair Avenue West, Yonge Street, Mt. Pleasant Road and Bayview Avenue). These are all areas where the Province is directing growth. Clicking on any of them will provide links to more information about the ward's Avenues/Urban Growth Centre, as well as links to the City's Official Plan and local secondary plans.
For ongoing council and community news, my contact information, along with a calendar of events, please visit www.joshmatlow.caClick here to read my previous city hall and community updates.
   

City Hall and Community Update for February 3rd 2017

Toronto’s Heritage Protection Policies Must Be Strengthened

Toronto has a shameful record when it comes to protecting its architectural heritage.

The wanton demolition of the Bank of Montreal building at 2444 Yonge Street last month, and the Stollery's Building at Yonge and Bloor in January 2015, are just two of the most recent examples of the City's inability to stay ahead of development applications. We need to implement a more proactive mechanism to protect better protect Toronto's built heritage before. That's why I moved a motion in 2015 to strengthen our heritage policy framework.

Currently, for a building to have protection, it must be either “listed” or “designated” under the Ontario Heritage Act (OHA). A very lengthy process is required for a property to become listed, including a full evaluation and completed Staff research report, followed by consideration by both Community Council and City Council. Only following City Council approval does a property become eligible for protection under the OHA, including demolition protections under the Ontario Planning Act. This review process can take up to five months to complete for a single property. For a property to become fully designated, the process can take up to eight months. There is nothing to save a heritage property from the wrecking ball while this process is taking place.

My motion asked City Planning staff to report back to Planning and Growth Management Committee on the feasibility of establishing a new tier of heritage designation that is more inclusive, proactive and expeditious. This new category would protect properties that have been identified but not yet evaluated for listing or designation.

We are still waiting on the Chief Planner to take action on this Council direction.

You can read more about the current challenges facing the City's heritage policy and my efforts to improve them in this article.

Also, for your convenience, I have created an interactive map of all heritage properties located in Ward 22.


City Staff Proposing Massive Fee Hikes for Patios

Small business owners across the city are sounding the alarm over a proposal from Licensing and Standards Staff that would see fees for some patios increase by over 1000%. While some adjustment might be reasonable, I will not support any measure that provides a disincentive for business owners to provide outdoor seating in appropriate locations.

Patios contribute to more fun and vibrant streets, our local economy and community residents' quality of life. Where residential neighbors aren't adversely impacted, the City should be working to encourage more patios instead of making them prohibitively expensive.

For more information on this issue, please read this article.


REMINDER: Community Skating Party with Josh Matlow, Rob Oliphant & Carolyn Bennett!

I'm excited to be co-hosting a community skating party with our local MPs, Rob Oliphant and Carolyn Bennett at Hodgson Ice Rink (East of Mt. Pleasant, entrance off Millwood/Harwood, behind Hodgson PS). 

Please join us from 2pm to 4pm on Sunday, February 12th for a fun, family-friendly afternoon with free coffee and hot chocolate.

I look forward to seeing you there!


REMINDER: Councillor Josh Matlow's 2017 City of Toronto Budget Town Hall Meeting

On Wednesday, February 8th at 7pm, I will be hosting my 2017 Budget Town Hall for Ward 22 residents at Christ Church Deer Park, Elliott Hall, 1570 Yonge Street.

The City of Toronto's budget will affect virtually every City service and your feedback is very important to me. I hope you will be able to attend.

If you would like more information on the proposed 2017 City of Toronto Budget in advance of my Town Hall meeting, please click here.


REMINDER: Let's Design Ward 22's Two New Park Spaces Together: Second Public Meeting

In early December 2016, I held an initial public meeting to gather residents' feedback on potential designs and uses for our two new parks on Manor Road East that we fought for together (the former Glebe Manor Lawn Bowling Club site and the corner of Manor Road and Forman Avenue). Since that meeting, the project design consultant has been busy developing design concepts based on that feedback and will be ready to share these drawings with the community shortly.

Please join me and your neighbours on Monday, February 27 to review and comment upon these concept designs for our two new parks! The meeting will be held at 6:30pm in the newly renovated sanctuary at Manor Road United Church (adjacent to one of our new park spaces at 240 Manor Road East). City of Toronto Parks staff will also be in attendance.


Midtown in Focus Study Continues

As part of our Midtown in Focus study, the City of Toronto is developing an area-wide vision for parks and public spaces in the Yonge-Davisville area. As a follow up to a successful workshop in the fall, myself and City Planning Staff are reconvening for another public meeting at 7pm on Wednesday, February 22nd at Northern District Library (40 Orchard View Boulevard). We would be pleased to hear your feedback and ideas on creating a safer and more vibrant public realm in the community!

If you have any questions please feel welcome to contact myself or the City Planner Paul Farish at 416-392-3529 or  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Updated Ward 22 Development Page

To ensure you are informed and engaged about developments being proposed for sites near your neighbourhood, I've created an interactive webpage

My webpage listing all the proposed developments in Ward 22 has recently been updated to reflect current development applications and, as always, contains locations, staff reports and public meeting notices. Additionally, the map now shows the boundaries of the Urban Growth Centre surrounding Yonge and Eglinton, as well as the designated Avenues (portions of Eglinton Avenue West, St. Clair Avenue West, Yonge Street, Mt. Pleasant Road and Bayview Avenue). These are all areas where the Province is directing growth. Clicking on any of them will provide links to more information about the ward's Avenues/Urban Growth Centre, as well as links to the City's Official Plan and local secondary plans.



Please click here to learn more about what you can do to help free Toronto from the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB).

   
   

City Hall and Community Update for January 20, 2017

Councillor Josh Matlow's 2017 City of Toronto Budget Town Hall Meeting

It's very important to me that I accurately reflect our community's priorities, and represent you, when I vote on our behalf on the City of Toronto's budget. On Wednesday, February 8 at 7pm, I'll host my 2017 Budget Town Hall for Ward 22 residents. The meeting will take place in Elliott Hall at Christ Church Deer Park (1570 Yonge Street).

The City of Toronto's budget will affect virtually every City service and encourage your feedback. I hope you will be able to attend.

If you would like more information on the proposed 2017 City of Toronto Budget in advance of my Town Hall meeting, please click here.

Annual Community Skating Party with Josh Matlow, Rob Oliphant & Carolyn Bennett!

I'm excited to be co-hosting a community skating party again this year with our local MPs, Rob Oliphant and Carolyn Bennett at Hodgson Ice Rink (east of Mount Pleasant Road, on Davisville Avenue behind Hodgson Sr. Public School). Please join us from 2-4pm on Sunday, February 12 for a fun, family-friendly afternoon of skating and hot chocolate.

I look forward to seeing you and your family there!

New Tenant Protection Legislation Approved

I am very pleased to report that my colleagues supported moving forward with a new program to provide much needed protection for Toronto renters. This success was the result of years of hard work with local tenant advocates and city-wide organizations, including the Federation of Metro Toronto Tenants’ Associations, ACORN, Advocacy Centre for Tenants Ontario, and community legal clinics.

At present, far too many renters live in sub-standard housing.  The City’s Multi Residential Audit Building (MRAB) program has found over 58,000 deficiencies in approximately 1000 buildings since Building Audits began.  Leaking roofs, stained carpets, non-functioning elevators, and pest infestations are far too common.  And these violations are mostly from just the shared areas in buildings and don’t capture the serious problems tenants face inside their units.

Some landlords have ignored City orders to fix their properties for years with little consequence; they treat the small fines as the cost of doing business, drag out performing the repairs through court appeals, and are even granted time extensions.

The system certainly doesn’t give tenants the same leniency when their rent is due.

This comprehensive new by-law includes several motions I moved to address some of these concerns, including:

  • A “Rentsafe” rating program for buildings modelled off of the “Dinesafe” program for restaurants that requires landlords to post a colour-coded sign that displays the City's rating in a prominent, publicly identifiable location, along with posting the same information on the City's website
  • Request the Province to grant the City the power to fine landlords for property standards violations
  • Establish guidelines for when the Property Standards Committee can grant time extensions on work orders for violations and to limit those criteria to situations that are only extraordinary circumstances
  • Develop standard operating procedures for City enforcement officers which provide targeted timelines by violation category to bring landlords into compliance with City by-laws from the date an order is issued, and make the standards available to the public on the City website

These measures, and many others contained in the program, were the result of extensive consultation with tenants across the city.

For more information, please see this Toronto Star article.


Ending the Tax Rebate for Vacant Stores

There are far too many empty storefronts on our main streets. They hurt neighbouring businesses and adversely impact our communities. That’s why I strongly support, and commend, Mayor Tory for his support for eliminating the City’s backward policy of providing tax rebates to landlords of vacant units.

For more information on how this measure could lead to more vibrant shopping areas in Midtown, please see this North Toronto Post article.


Toronto’s Climate Change Plan Moves Forward

In 2007, the City of Toronto adopted the target of reducing our greenhouse gas by 80% from 1990 levels by 2050. So far, we have reduced our emissions by 24%, but it is projected that Toronto will not meet our goal without significant further action.

There is an 8.7 million tonne gap between our projected GHG emissions in 2050 and our low-carbon target. Over the next 34 years, transformative changes to the City’s core urban systems - transportation, building design & operation, energy systems and waste management – will be necessary.

To read the full TrasformTO report, please click here.


Toronto Seniors Strategy 2.0 Hospital Consultation at Sunnybrook

Over the next two decades, the number of seniors in Toronto will more than double. To prepare for this, the City adopted its first age-friendly plan – the Toronto Seniors Strategy – in 2013. With 86 of the original 91 recommendations now implemented, the City and I, in my capacity as Toronto's Seniors' Advocate, are working with older Torontonians, caregivers, agencies and other orders of government to co-create the next version – "2.0".

As part of this next phase in the strategy, I proposed to City staff that we consult with older adults who are patients at Toronto's hospitals. Hospitalized seniors can often feel more like patients than citizens of our city. Today, we brought the City to them at Sunnybrook Hospital, where I was delighted to learn about the best ways to help them. I look forward to participating in subsequent consultations at our hospitals to gather further thoughtful feedback from in-patients on how we can improve their quality of life and connectedness to their city, as we develop Toronto's Seniors Strategy.



Let's Design Ward 22's Two New Park Spaces Together: Second Public Meeting

In early December 2016, I held an initial public meeting to gather residents' feedback on potential designs and uses for our two new parks on Manor Road East that we fought for together (the former Glebe Manor Lawn Bowling Club site and the corner of Manor Road and Forman Avenue). Since that meeting, the project design consultant has been busy developing design concepts based on that feedback and will be ready to share these drawings with the community shortly.

Please join me and your neighbours on Monday, February 27 to review and comment upon these concept designs for our two new parks! The meeting will be held at 6:30pm in the newly renovated sanctuary at Manor Road United Church (adjacent to one of our new park spaces at 240 Manor Road East). City of Toronto Parks staff will also be in attendance.

390-398 Spadina Road Development Town Hall Meeting

City Planning issued a refusal report to construct a 9-storey mixed-use building at 390-398 Spadina Rd, consisting of 46 residential units. Unfortunately, the developer has appealed this decision to the OMB.

While this development is actually located in Ward 21 (on the west side of Spadina Road), it will obviously impact many Ward 22 residents directly across Spadina Road and throughout the Ward 22 portion of Forest Hill Village. In fact, it threatens the very unique character of the Forest Hill Village.

In February 2014, I successfully moved a motion requesting City Planning Staff to study Forest Hill Village (located along Spadina Road) and prepare Urban Design Guidelines to protect the small town feeling of this distinctive area. The mandate for the Forest Hill Village Urban Design Guidelines is to maintain the small town character of the area by identifying the appropriate urban character, materials and building rhythm and articulation for future developments and/or renovations within the study area. This includes a Staff recommendation for a maximum of a four storeys street wall for the Village.

These new guidelines will help strengthen City Planning’s position when assessing future development applications for the Village. To learn more about the new guidelines, please see this City report that was approved today by Toronto & East York Community Council. To speak to the planner directly, please contact David Driedger at 416-392-7613 or  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

I look forward to joining my colleague, Councillor Joe Mihevc, and the South Forest Hill Residents' Association (SFHRA) for a community meeting about this proposal at 7:30pm in the West Tower Party Room at 400 Walmer Road. To view the full meeting flyer, please click here.

I would also like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the efforts of the South Forest Hill Residents' Association (SFHRA) in fighting the current development proposal, their shared passion to preserve the character of the Village and to ensure that any development at this location is an appropriate one. For more information about SFHRA, please click here.

Ward 22 Cycle Toronto Welcomes you to a New Member's Night

Are you interested in finding more about bike advocacy in Midtown over drinks and pub food? Do you want to join a talented team of local community cycling activists? On January 26, Ward 22 Cycle Toronto is holding a social meeting for new members and anyone interested in finding out more about what the group does, priorities for 2017 and how you can get involved. The meeting will start at 7:00 pm at The Abbot on Eglinton, between Spadina and Avenue.

For more information, contact Ken Brown:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Opportunity for Toronto Community Housing Tenants to Participate in the City's Tenants First Advisory Panel

If you're a Toronto Community Housing Tenant who has community leadership experience and is interested in helping shape the future of TCH and the non-profit housing sector, the City is looking for you to get involved with the Tenants First Implementation Plan. This plan focuses on creating transformative change within TCH through a number of actions based on recommendations from City staff, the Mayor's Task Force and consultation with tenants.

If you are interested in becoming a member of the Tenants First Advisory Panel and want more information, you can attend an information meeting on Tuesday, January 24 at 6-8pm Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen West, 2nd Floor, Committee Room 4.

Alternatively, you can receive more information by visiting the Tenants First Project Websitehere or contact Carmen Smith at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or by telephone at (416) 338-5716

Applications for the deadline are due by 5pm on February 3, 2017.

A Successful Ecumenical Food Drive in 2016

Through the support of many of you, the Drive was another success with some 16,000 items collected, slightly less than last year, but still remarkable for one day! In addition, over $3,000 in cash donations were received for further bulk purchases by the food banks to meet their special needs. A sincere thanks to all those who contributed and also to the many hard working volunteers who made this wonderful community event happen once again.

Free Mental Health Resources for Youth in the Community

The Delisle YouthCan Impact Walk-in provides free mental health and substance use counselling services for all youth between the ages of 13 to 21. Counsellors are there to discuss and provide support for a number of issues including depression, anxiety, bullying, sexual orientation, stress, substance abuse or other concerns.

The walk-in clinic is located at 40 Orchard View Blvd, Room #102 and operates at the following times:
  • Tuesday: 2pm-5pm (Please arrive by 3:30pm)
  • Wednesday: 4pm-7pm (Please arrive by 5:30pm)
  • Thursday: 2pm-6pm (Please arrive by 4:30pm)
  • Saturday: 10am-2pm (Please arrive by 12:30pm)
More information about this service can be found on their website here.
Updated Ward 22 Development Page

To ensure you are informed and engaged about development proposals being proposed for sites near your neighbourhood, I've created an interactive webpage

My Proposed Developments webpage has recently been updated to reflect current development applications and, as always, contains locations, staff reports and public meeting notices. Additionally, the map now shows the boundaries of the Urban Growth Centre surrounding Yonge and Eglinton, as well as the designated Avenues (portions of Eglinton Avenue West, St. Clair Avenue West, Yonge Street, Mt. Pleasant Road and Bayview Avenue). These are all areas where the Province is directing growth. Clicking on any of them will provide links to more information about the ward's Avenues/Urban Growth Centre, as well as links to the City's Official Plan and local secondary plans.
   

City Hall and Community Update for December 2, 2016

REMINDER: Public Meeting to Design Ward 22's Two New Park Spaces!

Working together as a community, we successfully fought to preserve green space at the former Glebe Manor Lawn Bowling Club site. We also worked amicably with the Manor Road United Church to create public space rather than a townhouse development at their site.

Now the fun part begins! Please join me and your neighbours to discuss potential designs and uses for our two new parks at 6:30pm on Tuesday, December 6 in the gymnasium at Maurice Cody Jr Public School. City of Toronto Parks staff will also be in attendance.

Please click here to view the event flyer.


Ward 22's Hodgson Ice Rink is Now Open for the 2016/2017 Skating Season!

I am happy to announce that our community ice rink at Hodgson is now open for your skating pleasure! 

I am pleased that the 2016/17 skating year will once again feature expanded community hours at Hodgson ice. The agreement with the TDSB reached last year will see the rink open for community hours starting at 11:30am (rather than 4:30pm) every weekday.

For more information regarding hours of operation and specific programming, please visit thiswebsite.


Manor Road United Church Grand Re-Opening Celebration

Manor Road United Church is celebrating the Grand Opening of their renovated space on Saturday, December 10 & Sunday, December 11 and everyone is welcome!  

The church has several events planned over the course of the weekend, including the 3rd annual Santa’s pancake breakfast at 9:30am - 11am on Saturday, a Christmas Concert and Carol Sing at 7pm on Saturday, and a Celebration Service at 10:30am on Sunday. I look forward to giving opening remarks and congratulations at the official Open House celebration at 11:45am on Sunday. I hope to see you there!


Please Join Me in Celebrating the Holiday Season with our Mount Pleasant Village and Midtown Yonge BIAs this Weekend!

On Saturday, December 3, Santa Claus, Mrs. Claus, their elves and more will be on hand to celebrate the Mount Pleasant Village BIA Christmas Fair. The day will be filled with fun activities, as well as in-store promotions. New for this year will be a scavenger hunt! The event will take place along Mount Pleasant Road between Eglinton and Davisville from 10am to 4pm.

Full event details are available here.

Also, come enjoy some local shopping and holiday fun on Yonge Street between Soudan and Davisville. The Midtown Yonge BIA are ringing in the season at the intersection of Yonge Street and Lola Road with a 20ft Christmas tree, carolers & Santa himself. This event will take place on Saturday, December 3 and 10 from 1pm to 4pm.

Please click here to view the Midtown Yonge BIA event flyer.


Annual 58th Toronto Scouts Christmas Tree Sale

If you'll be looking for a Christmas tree, our local kids with the 58th Scouts, Cubs & Beavers have one for you! For over 60 years, local Boy Scouts have been selling fresh, Ontario-grown Christmas trees & wreaths to neighborhood residents. The sale starts November 26 and, as always, they can be found on the main lawn at the Church of the Transfiguration (111 Manor Rd East). Open weekdays 6am -9pm (weather permitting) and Sat-Sun 9am-6pm. Deliveries available. Call or text 647-970-0947 or email  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Please click here to view the flyer.


Rosehill Reservoir Rehabilitation Project

As many of you are aware, the City of Toronto will be carrying out waterproofing and structure rehabilitation work on the Rosehill Reservoir at David Balfour Park. These necessary upgrades will help to ensure the structural integrity of the reservoir, extend its service life, and bring the infrastructure to a state of good repair. I have been pleased to work with my colleague, Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, City staff and local Residents' Associations on honing this restoration plan.

I certainly support the work that a core group of engaged residents has been doing toward the Vision Plan. We all want this park to be remarkable once the rehab work is completed, and I look forward to working together with the community on that front. 

Also, City staff had originally planned to host a Public Open House in November 2016 to discuss the project plans further with local residents. However, in response to comments received from the community so far, they have decided to postpone this event in order to allow for additional work to be completed. I will share the full meeting details with you for the Public Open House, once confirmed, via my e-newsletter and website. This event is anticipated to take place early in the New Year.


390-398 Spadina Road Development Proposal Update

City Planning recently issued a refusal report to construct a 9-storey mixed-use building at 390 Spadina Rd, consisting of 46 residential units. Unfortunately, the developer has appealed this decision to the OMB.

While this development is actually located in Ward 21 (on the west side of Spadina Road), it will obviously impact many Ward 22 residents directly across Spadina Road and throughout the Ward 22 portion of Forest Hill Village.

In February 2014, I successfully moved a motion requesting City Planning Staff to study Forest Hill Village (located along Spadina Road) and prepare Urban Design Guidelines to protect the small town feeling of this distinctive area. The mandate for the Forest Hill Village Urban Design Guidelines is to maintain the small town character of the area by identifying the appropriate urban character, materials and building rhythm and articulation for future developments and/or renovations within the study area. This includes a Staff recommendation for a maximum of four storeys  street wall for the Village.

These new guidelines will help strengthen City Planning’s position when assessing future development applications for the Village. To learn more about the new guidelines, please see this City report that was approved today by Toronto & East York Community Council. To speak to the planner directly, please contact David Driedger at 416-392-7613 or' ); // -->This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " target="_blank" style="text-size-adjust: 100%; color: #2baadf; text-decoration: underline;" mce_style="text-size-adjust: 100%; color: #2baadf; text-decoration: underline;"> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

I would also like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the efforts of the South Forest Hill Residents' Association (SFHRA) in fighting the current development proposal, their shared passion to preserve the character of the Village and to ensure that any development at this location is an appropriate one. For more information about SFHRA, please click here.

I look forward to joining SFHRA and my colleague, Councillor Joe Mihevc, for a community meeting about this proposal in the New Year. I will be sure to share details of that meeting with you via my e-newsletter and website, once known.

City of Toronto Invites Residents to Have their Say on Long-Term Financial Plan

The City of Toronto is hosting four public consultation meetings from December 5 to 8, in addition to an online survey that is available from December 5 to 23, to gather the public's input on how the City can manage expenses, raise revenue and optimize its assets as part of the development of its Long-Term Financial Plan.

Public meeting details:
  • Monday, December 5, Etobicoke Olympium, 590 Rathburn Rd.
  • Tuesday, December 6, Chinese Cultural Centre, 5183 Sheppard Ave. E.
  • Wednesday, December 7, Mitchell Field Community Centre, 89 Church Ave.
  • Thursday, December 8, Toronto Reference Library (Epic Hall), 789 Yonge St.
Each meeting features an open house session starting at 6pm. A staff presentation that begins at 7pm provides the context for table discussions, followed by an "open-mic" session for participants who want to make a brief statement. Pre-registration is requested athttp://www.investinginto.ca.

Live webcasts of the meetings will be available on the website for those who cannot attend in person, along with learning and background materials and the online survey. Consultation toolkits can be downloaded for those who want to conduct their own community meetings.

To keep Toronto strong and vibrant, there are some key issues that require attention, including transit, housing, investment in poverty reduction, and social cohesion. City Council has adopted economic, social and environmental strategies that can lead Toronto forward. A Long-Term Financial Plan will ultimately present options and create a road map to achieve long-term financial sustainability through multi-year expenditure and revenue strategies while supporting the City's ability to fund its city-building and policy aspirations.

Findings from the consultation process will be considered by the City Manager as he provides advice to Council on the development of the plan. A second phase of the consultation process, including another round of public meetings and an additional survey, will take place in 2017. Members of the public are also invited to join the conversation on social media, using the hashtag #InvestinginTO.

Winter Season Programming in Toronto

The City of Toronto offers affordable community recreation programming for the winter season. Residents of all ages can register for winter skating programs, swimming programs and March Break camps.

Get ready!
Registration begins at 7am on Saturday, December 3 for Etobicoke/York and Scarborough Districts, and 7am on Tuesday, December 6 for North York, Toronto and East York Districts.

Residents should visit toronto.ca/torontofun prior to registration day to:
  • Find out district registration dates
  • Build a list of choices (program titles and barcodes) using the website or the printed FUN Guide
  • Get a family number and client numbers to log in and register
  • Have a payment method ready or credit on the account, if fees apply

Residents can use the "Search Programs" options at toronto.ca/funguide to build wish lists and have a few options ready in case they don’t get into their first choice.

Using the website efun.toronto.ca is the easiest and fastest way to register for winter recreation. In September, 90 per cent of users were able to log in to the registration system in less than 11 minutes and, on average, once logged in, each registration was completed in just over seven minutes.

Those who wish to register for programs will need to set up an account. Call 416-338-4386, e-mail  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or speak with staff at a City community centre to get a family number and a client number, update your account information, put a credit on your account or request information on the Welcome Policy.

Welcome Policy yearly credit
The Welcome Policy credit can be used to register for City recreation programs. People receiving social assistance (Ontario Works) and living in Toronto are pre-approved to receive this credit and should speak to their caseworker. More information about the yearly credit is available at toronto.ca/wp.

Free programs
Many community centres offer free recreation programs including leisure swimming and skating, and drop-in programs for children, youth and older adults. More information about free and low-cost programming options is available at toronto.ca/lowcostrecreation.

Older adult discounts
Older adults (60+ years) who register for adult programs receive a 50 per cent discount.

#WelcomeTOwinter
Winter is arriving in Toronto’s parks, community centres and natural environments. Visittoronto.ca/winter for more information on winter activities and events.

Snow Clearing for Seniors and People with Disabilities in Toronto

If you are a senior or disabled resident of Toronto, the City will clear snow from the sidewalk in front of your home in those areas where the service is not provided by machine.

The City of Toronto provides sidewalk snow clearing in most of Toronto, however, there are some areas where equipment is unable to clear sidewalks due to insufficient sidewalk width for the plows, lack of boulevard space for snow storage, and on-street parking. Most of these areas are in the older, central parts of the city.

Seniors and people with disabilities living in areas where the city does not clear sidewalks can contact the City at 311 to register for the program. The service applies to the sidewalk in front of the home only. It does not include driveways or walkways leading to homes. All participants in the program must renew annually to continue to receive the service.


You can read more about this program, view a map of the areas where the city provides mechanical sidewalk snow clearing, and access the printable application here.

Take Steps to Prevent Frozen Pipes this Winter

The pipes in your home can freeze in cold weather. This can leave you with no water or cause
your pipes to burst, leading to expensive property damage. If your pipes are prone to freezing,
you may wish to contact a plumber for advice. Here are some other tips to protect your home:

Know your Pipes
  • Ensure you know where the main water shut-off valve is in your home and how it operates (in case your pipes burst)
  • Insulate pipes: wrap foam pipe insulation around pipes most at risk, especially near outside walls and in crawl spaces, the attic and garage
  • Eliminate drafts: seal air leaks in your home and garage to stop cold air from getting in
  • Check around windows and doors, electrical wiring, dryer vents and pipes
  • Drain and shut the outdoor water supply: outdoor faucets are the first to freeze
  • Unscrew any hoses, turn off the outdoor water supply and let the taps drain
When the Weather Drops Well Below Zero
  • Keep your pipes warm: keep areas that contain indoor pipes above 8 degrees C, especially near the water meter
  • Turn on the tap: for your own peace of mind, you can choose to run a pencil-thin stream of water to ensure some movement of water in the pipes. However, you will be charged for the water used if you choose this step.
For more information, visit toronto.ca/frozenpipes.

Annual 58th Toronto Scouts Christmas Tree Sale

If you'll be looking for a Christmas tree, our local kids with the 58th Scouts, Cubs & Beavers have one for you! For over 60 years, local Boy Scouts have been selling fresh, Ontario-grown Christmas trees & wreaths to neighborhood residents. The sale starts November 26 and, as always, they can be found on the main lawn at the Church of the Transfiguration (111 Manor Rd East). Open weekdays 6am -9pm (weather permitting) and Sat-Sun 9am-6pm. Deliveries available. Call or text 647-970-0947 or email  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Please click here to view the flyer.

   
   

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