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Welcome

Dear residents and friends,

 

I deeply appreciate your support and confidence and I look forward to an ongoing dialogue with you on the many issues, challenges and opportunities we'll face together as a community here in Ward 22, St. Paul's and as a city.

 

I'm advocating for a more thoughtful, creative and responsible new approach for city council. I want council to engage our city's residents with an inspiring plan and make informed decisions that are based on evidence, community consultation and the merits of arguments - rather than ideology or left or right-wing partisanship.

 

My staff and I are here to assist you with any concerns or questions you may have. We're also working every day to improve our local neighbourhoods- along with supporting the many valued services Torontonians rely on every day. You are always welcome to contact me at 416-392-7906 or by email at councillor_matlow@toronto.ca.

 

Sincerely,

 

 

 

Josh

Latest Videos

Councillor Matlow spoke on options for the Scarborough Subway, March 31, 2016.

Councillor Matlow spoke on tenant issues related to the Residential Tenancies Act, December 18 2013.

 

City Hall and Community Update for May 19, 2016

Our Community's Sharon, Lois & Bram Music Garden is Officially Open!



I recently had the privilege of welcoming local residents, MP Carolyn Bennett, and Mayor John Tory to June Rowlands (Davisville) Park for a performance by Sharon & Bram. The iconic Canadian children’s musicians (and midtown residents themselves) delighted the large audience as part of a celebration of the opening of the new Sharon, Lois & Bram Playground and Music Garden.


The event was the culmination of years of work to design and construct the Music Garden in partnership with Sharon, Lois & Bram, the remarkable Lesley Stoyan from Apple Tree Markets Group, the City's Parks staff and dedicated local parents and residents.


An elephant sculpture now stands at the entrance of the Garden welcoming children to the world of the trio’s beloved Elephant Show TV program. The new play structure features a stage connected to interactive musical instruments, including bongos and a xylophone.


The new Music Garden is part of a larger initiative I have undertaken to expand and improve green space in our community, and our quality of life, including future additions to June Rowlands (Davisville) Park. We've already worked with local parents to provide a splash pad and some new playground equipment there and public consultation will begin this autumn on a second phase, which will further improve the park.


Reuse, Recycle, Safely Dispose: Ward 22's Community Environment Day


Please join me at my annual Community Environment Day event. I hope to see you there!


Community Environment Day helps reduce the amount of reusable, recyclable or household hazardous waste going into landfill. The program provides a convenient way for you to drop off reusable and recyclable items such as clothing, small appliances, non-perishable food, electronics, etc. You can drop off household hazardous waste for safe disposal. By doing these things, you will also help support charities, schools, the local "sharing" economy and create new "green" jobs. For more information, please click here or call 311.


 


Family Fun at Ward 22's Spring Fun Fairs!


Over the next few weeks, I look forward to enjoying many of the spring fun fairs at some of Ward 22's remarkable schools. These community celebrations also raise funds toward our local parent councils' priorities. Thank you to all the volunteers who have done so much work on organizing these events!


  • Brown Jr PS – Garden Fete (May 28, 11am-3pm)
  • Maurice Cody Jr PS – Spring Fair (May 28, 10am-3pm)
  • Oriole Park Jr PS – May Fair (May 28, 11am-3pm)
  • Cottingham Jr PS – Fun Fair (June 4, 11am-3:30pm)
  • Eglinton Jr PS – Spring Fair (June 4, 11am-2pm)
  • Deer Park Jr and Sr PS – Fun Fair (June 9, 3:30pm-7pm)

 


Ward 22's Davisville Village Farmers’ Market Opens for Another Season!


I'm delighted to support AppleTree Markets, a local Ward 22 non-profit organization, that will once again be transforming June Rowlands (Davisville) Park into a vibrant "town square" for the fifth year of our community's popular farmers’ market at June Rowlands (Davisville) Park. The market is a place where you are sure to see friends and neighbours, while buying fresh produce, fish, meats, chocolate, and so much more.

 

This season, the market is open again and will operate weekly on Tuesdays between 3 and 7pm. I look forward to seeing you there!


Save the Date: 18 Brownlow Avenue Public Meeting


A rezoning application has been submitted to City Planning t
o construct two residential towers. I understand that there will be revisions to the original proposal presented by the applicants at this meeting.

 

To speak to the planner directly, please contact Giulio Cescato at 416-392-0459 or g This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Also, you may mail your comments to the planner at Toronto and East York District, 100 Queen St W Floor 18 E Toronto On, M5H 2N2.

 

This meeting will take place at 7pm on Tuesday, May 31.

 

Please note: The location of this public meeting is still TBD. I will be sure to post the venue on my website as soon as I receive that information.

 


Don't Let Your Basement Be Next – Get Tips on How to Prevent Basement Flooding


It's springtime, and the City is once again reminding homeowners to take steps to help prevent their basements from flooding. The City is doing its part to prevent heavy rainfall and runoff from ending up in your basement – by continually updating and maintaining Toronto's complex system of underground pipes, sewers and catch basins. Now find out what you can do by clicking here. Possible ways to limit a homeowner's risk of flooding include:

  • Fixing cracks in foundation
  • Ensuring the ground slopes away from the house
  • Clearing debris from eavestroughs and downspouts
  • Installing a sump pump to remove excess water
  • Installing a backwater valve to prevent water and sewage from backing up
  • Diverting your downspouts away from the foundation

 


City Reminds All Road Users to be Safe


The safety of all road users is a priority for the City of Toronto. That's why the City is reminding pedestrians, motorists and cyclists to take extra care, especially when travelling in residential neighbourhoods.


The City has produced lawn signs that encourage all motorists to drive safely as they travel in our neighbourhoods. To get a lawn sign, please contact my office at 416-392-7906 or  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it and I would be happy to deliver a sign to your door.


It's critical to be aware of your surroundings at all times when you are travelling.  All road users need to remember that safety is everyone's responsibility.


Annual D-Day Commemoration at Toronto City Hall


On Monday, June 6th at Nathan Phillips Square from 12pm-1pm, the City of Toronto will recognize the importance of honouring the service of our D-Day veterans.


All residents of Toronto are invited to join our war veterans who took part in the Allied invasion of Normandy, France on June 6, 1944, in commemorating this special occasion. This is an important time to celebrate and honour our veterans, to remember their sacrifice, and to teach our youth about the contributions made by veterans and the fallen heroes of this historic campaign.


The program includes a musical prelude which will begin at 12 noon followed by the official ceremony at 12:30pm. For further information you can visit the official website.


1 St. Clair Avenue West Mural – Public Consultation


Join the Sustainable Thinking and Expression on Public Space(STEPS) Initiative for a community info session about the 1 St Clair West mural, planned for summer 2016. Informed by input from hundreds of local residents and businesses, attendees will get a sneak peak at the mural's design.


The public consultation will take place on Thursday, May 26th from 6:30pm-7:30pm at
Deer Park Library (40 St Clair Ave E). To RSVP, please click here.


Spadina’s Austin Family and the Great War – A Full Day Program at the Spadina Museum


The Spadina Museum was home to the prominent Austin family for more than a century. On June 3rd, the Ontario Genealogical Society (OGS) is hosting a full day event at the Spadina Museum as part of the 2016 OGS Conference. The day will begin with a guided tour of the mansion, followed by lunch and time to explore the restored grounds and Edwardian gardens. There will be two presentations in the afternoon, including discussions and hands-on sessions with artifacts and archival documents from the First World War-era. These artifacts and documents will allow attendees to have a view of the war through the eyes of a soldier, a nurse, and an affluent family left on the home front.


Please register online here. For registration assistance please email  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


City of Toronto's long-weekend activities include fireworks at Ashbridges Bay Park on Victoria Day


The City of Toronto will offer a wide variety of activities for residents on Monday, May 23, including the annual Victoria Day fireworks display at Ashbridges Bay. Many family attractions, including two farms, two historic sites and other facilities will be open, however City-operated recreation centres will be closed and recreation programs will not operate that day.


The City of Toronto will host Victoria Day fireworks at Ashbridges Bay Park starting at 10 p.m. on May 23. The show will feature about 2,000 fireworks, with a spectacular finale.


Golf:
Toronto's five municipal golf courses are located on beautiful parklands and offer early-bird rates. These affordable, high-quality and TTC-accessible courses are open daily, including Victoria Day. More information about City-run golf courses is available at http://toronto.ca/golf.


Tennis courts:
All public tennis courts will have nets up and be available for use throughout the Victoria Day weekend. Public sites are free and available to the general public. Tennis players are asked to share the courts by limiting their play time to half-hour intervals if others are waiting to use the courts. More information about public tennis courts is available at http://toronto.ca/tennis.


Splash pads:
Splash pads will begin to operate across the city on Saturday, May 21, with a few exceptions at sites under repair or located on outdoor pool decks. Splash pads operate daily from 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. and are activated through push-button features. Caregivers are reminded to supervise their children at these unsupervised water play areas. Information about splash pad locations, closures and late opening sites is available at http://www1.toronto.ca/parks/prd/facilities/splash-pads/index.htm or by calling 311.


Riverdale Farm:
Riverdale Farm is home to a variety of domestic farm animals, including Tamworth pigs, baby goats and Cotswold lambs. The breeds represent animals commonly found on a turn-of-the-century Ontario farm. Riverdale Farm is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and admission is free. More information is available at http://toronto.ca/parks/zoo or by calling 311.


High Park Zoo:
Victoria Day is a great time to see the High Park Zoo's spring babies, including baby reindeer Snowflake. This attraction is open daily, year-round from 7 a.m. to dusk. More information: http://toronto.ca/parks/zoo.


Toronto Island Park:
Beginning on Friday, May 20, the City will switch to its summer ferry schedule, offering trips to the islands every 15 minutes. Toronto Island Park is a great place for a scenic picnic, hike or bike ride and also features the interactive Franklin Children's Garden. Many attractions offered by independent operators are also onsite including Centreville Theme Park (opening May 21) and Far Enough Farm. As a popular destination spot, especially on beautiful, sunny days, Toronto Island Park can get quite busy. To help plan their day and avoid the ferry lineups, members of the public can check the peak-times schedule at http://toronto.ca/ferry. Fares and other information about the amusement park and farm are available here.


Conservatories:
A wide variety of flowers are in full bloom at Centennial Park Conservatory (151 Elmcrest Rd.) and Allan Gardens Conservatory (19 Horticultural Ave.). Both conservatories are open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., all year long. Admission is free. Information is available by calling Centennial Park Conservatory at 416-394-8543 and Allan Gardens Conservatory at 416-392-7288, or visiting http://toronto.ca/conservatories.


Bike and skate parks:
The City maintains several bike and skate parks across Toronto, including the new Sunnyside Bike Park which opened for the season on May 15. Locations and details: http://toronto.ca/parks/bikeparks.


Historic sites:
Two of the City's 10 historic sites, Fort York National Historic Site and Spadina Museum, will offer events, activities and tours on Victoria Day, Monday, May 23; remaining sites will be closed. All of the historic sites will be open over the weekend, except for the Market Gallery which will be closed on Sunday. Admission fees and activities details vary by location. More information is available at http://www.toronto.ca/museum-events.


Bladder Cancer Awareness Month


Bladder Cancer Canada (BCC) is launching the first Bladder Cancer Awareness Month in May. Bladder cancer is the 5th most common cancer in Canada, yet is relatively unknown to the public. Events are planned across Canada in May to promote awareness of #BladderCancer and BCC is calling on Canadians to #ShowYellow. On May 14, BCC celebrated Bladder Cancer Awareness Month in spectacular fashion. Toronto's CN Tower was lit in yellow and red to support BCC’s “See Red? See Your Doctor” Campaign.


Please click here to find out how easy it is to get involved. And visit the website to find out more about Bladder Cancer Awareness Month.


Crosstown LRT Eglinton Station Open House


Metrolinx, the provincial agency that is responsible for the construction of the Eglinton Crosstown,  is hosting an open house for the future Eglinton station on Monday May 30th.  For more information, please click here. If you have any questions, concerns or complaints about their construction, you may contact the Crosstown Community Office at 416-782-8118.


Updated Ward 22 Development Page

To ensure you are informed and engaged about development proposals being proposed for sites near your neighbourhood, I've created an interactive webpage.
My Proposed Developments webpage has recently been updated to reflect current development applications and, as always, contains locations, staff reports and public meeting notices. Additionally, the map now shows the boundaries of the Urban Growth Centre surrounding Yonge and Eglinton, as well as the designated Avenues (portions of Eglinton Avenue West, St. Clair Avenue West, Yonge Street, Mt. Pleasant Road and Bayview Avenue). These are all areas where the Province is directing growth. Clicking on any of them will provide links to more information about the ward's Avenues/Urban Growth Centre, as well as links to the City's Official Plan and local secondary plans.

Please click here to learn more about what you can do to help free Toronto from the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB).

For ongoing council and community news, my contact information, along with a calendar of events, please visit www.joshmatlow.caClick here to read my previous city hall and community updates.

   
   

City Hall and Community Update for April 26, 2016

Rail Safety Town Hall Meeting, Tomorrow!


Disasters over the past several years in Lac Megantique, in Northern Ontario, and the United States have demonstrated the risks involved with moving hazardous materials, such as crude oil, by rail. That's why I've been working with local residents and community organizations for several years now to convince the federal government to put responsible regulations in place to protect Canadians. You can read my 2014 motion to City Council on this important issue
here.


In 2015, I wrote a letter, signed by my colleagues to urge the then-Transportation Minister Lisa Raitt to enact significant safety measures. This commitment was recently renewed with my letter to Hon. Marc Garneau, the new Minister of Transportation, that was also signed by Mayor Tory and all councillors representing wards that are traversed by the CP rail line. I commend the new government for actively listening to our concerns and am very hopeful they will soon move forward with necessary measures to protect residents living near rail corridors.


The urgent importance of our initiative has been recognized by the Toronto Star and other media outlets. Now is the time for action to protect our communities!


Also, I am pleased to have been asked by local MPs Carolyn Bennett and Chrystia Freeland to moderate a conversation at public meeting with Minister Garneau. Please join me for this important event at 6:30pm on Wednesday, April 27 at Walmer Road Baptist Church (188 Lowther Avenue).



Deer Park Accessible Playground Groundbreaking Ceremony


Deer Park Public School was one of the many schools that had its wooden play structures removed a decade ago due to safety concerns. The few play stuctures on site are inadequate for the special needs students at the school and in the wider community.


That's why I was happy to support the efforts of local parents, and Trustee Laskin, to contribute funds through a motion toward a new, fully accessible playground at Deer Park last year. This new playground will ensure that every child in the community will be finally able to play with their friends, rather than sit on the sidelines.


This morning, the community celebrated the start of this important project with a groundbreaking ceremony that I was honoured to participate in. I look forward to the project being completed soon and seeing children of all abilities enjoying the new playground!




Reuse, Recycle, Safely Dispose: Ward 22's Community Environment Day


Please join me at my annual Community Environment Day event. I hope to see you there!


Date: Thursday, June 2, 2016

Time: 4pm - 8pm

Location: North Toronto Memorial Arena parking lot (174 Orchard View Blvd)


Community Environment Day helps reduce the amount of reusable, recyclable or household hazardous waste going into landfill. The program provides a convenient way for you to drop off reusable and recyclable items such as clothing, small appliances, non-perishable food, electronics, etc. You can drop off household hazardous waste for safe disposal. By doing these things, you will also help support charities, schools, the local "sharing" economy and create new "green" jobs. For more information, please click here or call 311.


Ward 22's Davisville Village Farmers’ Market Opens for Another Season!


I'm delighted to support AppleTree Markets, a local Ward 22 non-profit organization, that will once again be transforming June Rowlands Park into a vibrant "town square" for the fifth year of our community's popular farmers’ market at June Rowlands (Davisville) Park. The market is a place where you are sure to see friends and neighbours, while buying fresh produce, fish, meats, chocolate, and so much more.

 

This season, the market begins on May 10th and will operate weekly on Tuesdays between 3 and 7pm. I look forward to seeing you there!


Jane's Walks 10th Anniversary


Interested in learning more about the city's distinct neighbourhoods and diverse cultures? This year, volunteers from across the city will be leading Jane's Walks, a celebration of the legacy Jane Jacob's left on our city.


Two Jane's Walks will be occurring in Ward 22, and best of all, they're free!
The first, "Trains, Trams and Roads in Summerhill and Deer Park," will be a one-hour walk led by Ken Brown on May 7. You can find out more about this walk here. The second, "Retracing Stop Spadina", will be a two-hour walk led by HiMY SYeD on May 1 and 7. You can find out more about this walk here.


For more information about Jane's Walks and many other events happening around Toronto, please click here.


Funding Opportunity for Community Groups


The City is encouraging non-profit organizations that address community safety or access, equity and human rights of equity-seeking groups to apply for two different grant programs.

Access, Equity and Human Rights (AEHR) Investment Funding


The Access, Equity and Human Rights (AEHR) Investment Program provides short-term funding to community-based projects that act on human rights, accessibility, equity, discrimination and hate crime concerns in their neighbourhoods and communities. (Deadline for application is at 11:59pm, June 8.)

Community Safety Investment (CSI) Funding


The Community Safety Investment (CSI) program provides short-term funding of 1-3 years for outcome-focused activities that build community capacity for violence prevention and increase safety for the most vulnerable groups in Toronto. Priority will be given to community groups that help seniors, youth most vulnerable to involvement in serious violence and crime, newcomers, undocumented workers and Neighbourhood Improvement Areas (NIAs) (Deadline for application is at 11:59pm, June 15.)


An information session for these grant programs will also be held May 4 at City Hall from 10am-12pm.


Province Backs Away from Problematic Childcare Regulations


I’m pleased to report that the Province has responded to the sincere concerns from parents and the City’s Children Services by backing away from proposed changes that further compromised the affordability and accessibility of childcare. These regulations would have lowered the age groupings for infants and toddlers, that would have lead to a reduction of over 2000 child care spaces and increased fees for parents.


These impacts are outlined in detail in this report prepared in response by the City.


Updated Ward 22 Development Page

To ensure you are informed and engaged about development proposals being proposed for sites near your neighbourhood, I've created an interactive webpage.

My Proposed Developments webpage has recently been updated to reflect current development applications and, as always, contains locations, staff reports and public meeting notices. Additionally, the map now shows the boundaries of the Urban Growth Centre surrounding Yonge and Eglinton, as well as the designated Avenues (portions of Eglinton Avenue West, St. Clair Avenue West, Yonge Street, Mt. Pleasant Road and Bayview Avenue). These are all areas where the Province is directing growth. Clicking on any of them will provide links to more information about the ward's Avenues/Urban Growth Centre, as well as links to the City's Official Plan and local secondary plans.

Please click here to learn more about what you can do to help free Toronto from the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB).

For ongoing council and community news, my contact information, along with a calendar of events, please visit www.joshmatlow.caClick here to read my previous city hall and community updates.

   
   

City Hall and Community Update for April 5, 2016

A Comprehensive Rapid Transit Plan Moves Forward with a Network Approach

 

I hope that we are closer than we ever have been before.

 

As you know, I have strongly advocated for a more honest and comprehensive approach to transit planning in Toronto and the GTHA. I've also challenged plans that made no sense in order to make them better and less costly. For far too long, our city has looked at projects in isolation, and through the cynical lens of self-serving political pursuits, which has led to inaction or, even worse, terrible and expensive decisions.

 

That’s why I am very pleased that Council has asked Chief Planner Jennifer Keesmaat to continue studying a coordinated, network-approach transit plan that includes:

  • The Relief Line subway
  • SmartTrack
  • Express One Stop Scarborough Subway Extension
  • Eglinton Crosstown East Extension to UofT Scarborough
  • Eglinton Crosstown West Extension to the Airport
  • Waterfront East LRT
  • Waterfront West LRT

While I am actually optimistic that this new approach will lead to better results, I do have several questions. For example, I want to know if there might be cost savings if the revised Scarborough subway follows the route of an existing at-grade corridor that is currently being used for the SRT as both TTC and Metrolinx reports suggest.  My colleagues, including Mayor John Tory, overwhelmingly supported my motion to ask Staff to explore whether it would be possible.

 

I am very grateful to Mayor Tory for choosing a more evidence-based approach on transit planning and being willing to champion a better plan. I also deeply appreciate the work of our chief planner, along with her tireless and skilled team, who worked around the clock to deliver this plan to Council.

 

Too many Torontonians have been waiting for too long for a transit plan that makes sense, and can be built ASAP to improve their lives. Our system is already overcrowded on lines such as the Yonge subway through midtown down to Bloor, along streetcar routes such as King and at capacity on routes such as the existing Scarborough RT.

 

We now need to move forward with a network plan we believe in, and work hard to ensure the funding is in place to see the plan through to fruition.

 

It is expected that the results of this study will be brought to Council this June. As always, I'll continue to keep you up to date.


Revised Gardiner Hybrid Plan Approved by Council

 

Last week, Council approved a modified hybrid reconfiguration specifically for the 1.4 km Gardiner East section. The new plan removes one of the ramps and pushes the elevated roadway back from the waterfront at a significant cost.

 

As I have previously written, I would have preferred the “Boulevard” option. While this new plan allows for a more connected waterfront and opens up more land for development, it will still be direct our limited resources toward serving relatively few people.

 

The revised hybrid will now cost approximately $500 million more than removing the elevated highway and replacing it with an at-grade boulevard. It will now also demand cars slow down significantly for a portion (due to the turn radias connecting the DVP). However, the construction time will be shorter than the Boulevard option.

 

For the same cost, the City could have fulfilled a promise to new businesses and residents by moving forward with the Waterfront East LRT, or helped address any one of Toronto’s long list of unfunded capital priorities, including the backlog in social housing repairs or the Relief Subway line.

 

In total, I believe history will not view this decision kindly. However, I also acknowledge that Council made the best decision based on the options (which discluded the Boulevard) in front of it last week.


New Music Strategy Supported by Council

 

A new music strategy that hopes to unleash the economic development potential of Toronto’s Music industry, in much the same way the film industry was developed, received unanimous approval from Council. The new plan will promote music-based tourism to our city while looking at better ways to support artists.

 

There was concern expressed by some residents that approving this initiative would lead to new exemptions for amplified music in City parks. I worked with Councillor Wong-Tam and other colleagues to address these concerns with a motion that referred any proposed noise by-law changes to the Noise by-law review currently being undertaken by Licensing & Standards Committee.


Noise By-Law Review

 

I deferred the previous proposals by Staff that allowed for a more lax noise by-law. I have been informed that Staff will be bringing an improved set of recommendations to Licensing & Standards Committee this May. I know this is an important issue for many in our community and I will provide further updates when the new report is released. I will certainly continue to do everthing possible to protect the quality of life in our neighbourhoods.


Province Moving in Wrong Direction on Surplus School Properties

 

It was very timely that Council debated the City’s position on regulations related to school boards selling surplus properties. As part of the province’s Grants for Student Needs funding, the Ministry of Education announced that both the City and other school boards will have to pay full market value for school properties deemed surplus.

 

This move will make it more difficult to keep public land in public hands. As Chair of the City-School Boards Advisory Committee, I will work with Mayor Tory to advocate for the Toronto’s interests on this issue.


Improving the Response to Infill Construction Sites

 

Throughout many of our neighbourhoods we are fighting a dramatic increase in inappropriate infill development projects that threaten the fabric and stability of our residential communities. The battles have played out through the Committee of Adjustment and the Ontario Municipal Board, where they often are approved and residents are then forced to start the next fight – the construction process.

 

When these new homes are built, it is incredibly disruptive to local residents, as they are being built right in the heart of residential neighbourhoods and the impacts are literally in people’s front yards. Often, contractors will work beyond permitted noise bylaw hours, they take over on-street parking, and block the public right of way. Of particular concern is the excessive noise and dust from stone and rock cutting performed on site, which is disruptive and hazardous for immediate neighbours. On some streets there are several of these projects occurring simultaneously, and once one job is completed another begins.

 

I have been working with several residents to help mitigate the impacts these infill construction sites have on the local community and last week City Council approved a strategy to help address this issue.

 

The City’s strategy aims to:


  • Improve the complaint management strategy to manage and respond to complaints more quickly;
  • Improve communication with residents to provide clear, understandable information so that issues can be resolved in a more timely manner;
  • Encourage good construction practices in the building industry through education, more effective enforcement, increased use of tickets, and an additional mandatory inspection and increased building inspector knowledge.

 

City Council also directed the Executive Director of Municipal Licensing and Standards to work in consultation with Toronto Buildings, The Energy and Environment Office and Toronto Public Health to come back to City Council in 2017 with recommendations on dust control measures related to infill construction.

 

For your review, here is the report that was approved at City Council last week.


Further Progress for Creating a Made-for-Toronto Local Appeal Body (LAB)

 

Last week, Council approved the implementation of a (LAB) for the City after a follow-up report from February 2016. Three out of the five motions were approved and can be viewed here. The background for this decision comes from the Province of Ontario granting the City of Toronto the power to establish a LAB, to hear "appeals" of Committee of Adjustment decisions on both minor variances and consent applications.

 

While this is a better process, I look forward to seeing more details as the LAB begins to take shape. This LAB will be arms-length from Council and completely independent.

 

In was clear to me that this is not an initiative City Staff would've proposed themselves, based on their responses at Council. I also do have some concerns about the downloading of costs to the City for the appeals work from the Province.

 

That being said, the Province currently only allows Toronto to create a local body to hear minor variances appeals, not on large-scale development projects. They have said at various times that Toronto must move forward with this LAB before they will seriously consider freeing us from the OMB. Therefore, I believe its a necessary step we must take.

 

We now need to continue advocating to completely free Toronto from the OMB's purview with regard to other impactful planning decisions, such as large-scale development in our communities.


Ontario Extending Funding to Paramedicine Programs for Seniors!

As Toronto's Seniors Advocate, I recently met with Ontario's Minister Responsible for Seniors, Mario Sergio, to discuss a wide array of priorities to Toronto's seniors including the import and convenience of these programs to many seniors and how these programs can contribute to lessening demand on 911, hospital waiting rooms and emergency services.

Please read today's article about the Province's wonderful and helpful announcement. Thank you especially to Dr. Samir Sinha, Minister Mario Sergio and Minister Eric Hoskins for your advocacy and action.

New Solar Panel on Local EMS Station Will Reduce CO2 and Create Revenue

Shifting to renewable power is one important measure that cities can take to help cut CO2. As a School Trustee I helped to initiate the Green Grid program which uses solar panels to create clean energy and teach kids about environmental stewardship. As your City Councillor, I am proud to be involved in a similar program that uses City facilities to reduce our reliance on the traditional energy grid while creating additional revenue for the City.

 

In Ward 22, a new solar panel has just been installed on the roof of EMS Station 18 at 643 Eglinton Avenue West. The 10 kilowatt panel generates about 11,000 kilowatt hours of clean electricity per year, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by about 500 kilograms annually. This project will generate $80,000 in revenue for the City over its 20 year lifespan through the sale of electricity to the Province under a micro Feed-in Tariff contract.

 

Increasing the use of renewable energy is only one change that cities can make to reduce greenhouse gases. Expanding public transit, designing more compact, walkable neighbourhoods and planting more trees can also significantly reduce our environmental footprint while improving our quality of life and the economy.

 

To learn more about what local governments around the world are doing to improve the environment, please click here.


Ward 22's Davisville Village Farmers’ Market Opens for Another Season!

 

AppleTree Markets, a local Ward 22 non-profit organization, will once again be transforming June Rowlands Park into a temporary town square for the fifth year of their popular farmers’ market. I am delighted to support this community-building initiative at June Rowlands (Davsiville) Park. The market has been a place where you are sure to see friends and neighbours, while buying fresh produce, fish, meats, chocolate, and so much more.


This season, the market begins on May 10 and will operate weekly on Tuesdays between 3 and 7pm. I look forward to seeing you there!


Improving the Midtown Yonge Streetscape and Supporting Small Business

 

With the Yonge station set to open at the intersection of Yonge and Eglinton in 2020, it is imperative that the local BIA start developing a unified streetscape design as soon as possible.

 

That's why I moved a motion to provide the Midtown Yonge BIA with $47,500, fully funded by Section 37 community benefits, to design a Streetscape Masterplan that will start the process of adding new trees, street furniture and other enhancements in the coming years.

 

This plan will help improve the walkability and attractiveness of the street which will, in turn, help attract new businesses to the neighbourhood.

 

Please feel welcome to attend the upcoming open house, to review and provide feedback on the current proposal with PLANT ARCHITECT Inc, the BIA Board of Management and staff from the City's BIA Office.The meeting will be held from 5pm to 9pm on Tuesday, April 19 at Grano (2035 Yonge Street).

 


Lionel Conacher Park Splash Pad Public Meeting


Please join me on Wednesday, April 27, 2016 at 7pm to discuss an exciting, new children's splash pad for
Lionel Conacher Park.

 

The meeting will take place in the Gymnasium at Cottingham Junior Public School (85 Birch Avenue) and will give you a chance to review the new splash pad design with myself and Parks, Forestry & Recreation staff. I hope to see you there!


St. Clair Avenue West Mural Project

 

The award-winning public arts organization STEPS, responsible for the World’s Tallest Mural at Sherbourne and Wellesley is teaming up with Slate Asset Management and celebrated international artist PHLEGM to create a 12-storey mural at 1 St. Clair Avenue West.

 

As part of STEPS' consultation process, they are conducting a survey to gather resident feedback to help inform the mural's design. To access the survey and learn more about this project, please click here.


Growing Up: Planning for Children in New Vertical Communities

City Planning has initiated a study entitled Growing Up: Planning for Children in New Vertical Communities.  The study seeks to examine how families with children and youth can be better accommodated in mid and high-rise neighbourhoods – the fastest growing building type in the city. The objective of the study is to ensure that families with kids, both present and future, are provided with the opportunity to grow up and thrive in higher density housing.

 

This study follows up on a number of City Planning initiatives to encourage family friendly developments including the deferred 2010 draft OPA to require 3 bedroom units in new developments, the Condominium Consultations and the Chief Planner's Roundtable on Planning Cities for Families. The study will address both the quantity and quality of new housing by exploring the needs of families at three scales (the unit, the building and the neighbourhood) and result in new Official Plan policies and a Handbook containing performance standards and guidelines.

 

The study website has been updated to include the study approach which explains the work being undertaken in each of the three phases.  An overview of the consultation approach which lists all of the consultation activities that will be undertaken throughout the course of the study is attached.  You may also be interested in reviewing demographic profiles of households with children in each of our seven study areas: the Downtown and Centres (Etobicoke, North York, Yonge Eglinton, and Scarborough Civic Centres) as identified on Map 2 Urban Structure as well as two additional areas – Humber Bay Shores and the Sheppard Corridor.

 

As part of the first phase of the study, we have launched an online survey to learn about the experiences of families raising children in mid and high-rise buildings.

 

If you have any questions or would like to discuss further, feel free to contact Ann-Marie Nasr, Manager, SIPA,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 416-392-3078.


24-Hour Client Care Centre Number for Toronto Community Housing (TCHC) Residents

 

Following a recent meeting I conducted with residents and staff from TCHC, it was brought to my attention that a very useful, yet under-utilized resource exists to assist tenants in accessing important requests. TCHC tenants can speak with a client care representative 24/7 for emergency and routine maintenance requests, questions about rent or leases, requests to transfer to a different unit, information about how to add or remove someone from a lease, or many other matters pertaining to your tenancy.

 

The system operates similarly to Toronto's 311 service, whereby each request is processed efficiently and assigned a unique reference number the caller can follow up on.

 

TCHC Client Care can be reached at 416-981-5500.

 

For information on a number of other important contact numbers for TCHC tenants, please click here.


Public Consultations on the Recommendations from the Mayor's Task Force on Toronto Community Housing

 

Toronto Community Housing tenants are invited to public meetings regarding the recommendations made in the final report of the Mayor’s Task Force on Toronto Community Housing. The meetings will be an opportunity for tenants to hear about the recommendations and share their views regarding how the City should move forward on the Task Force recommendations.

 

Please click here for a complete list of meeting dates and locations between April 11th to 25th.


The Probus Club Wants You!

 

THE PROBUS CLUB of TORONTO welcomes PROfessional BUSiness men and women who have retired from their jobs or businesses and want to maintain a social network with others who have similar interests. The club meets on the 2nd Wednesday of each month from 10am to 12pm in the Holy Rosary Parish Hall, 356 St. Clair Ave. West.

 

For more information on joining the Probus Club of Toronto, please e-mail  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Access, Equity and Human Rights Awards Nominations Now Open

Do you know someone or a community group who is making a difference in Toronto by reducing barriers to civic participation? Celebrate their accomplishments – nominate them for an award!

 

The City's Access, Equity and Human Rights Awards recognize significant efforts of Toronto residents who are working to build a city in which all residents are full and equal participants in the social, cultural, economic, recreational and political life of the city. Each year, the City celebrates the contributions made by nominated residents or groups at an awards ceremony held in December.

 

Deadline for submitting nominations is Monday, May 2, 2016.

 

Nominees must be residents of the City of Toronto. To nominate and for more information including past recipients, please click here.


City of Toronto Long-Term Waste Management Strategy - Next Steps

Solid Waste Management Services is undertaking the development of a Long Term Waste Management Strategy ("Waste Strategy") to guide decision making on how the City's waste will be managed over the next 30 to 50 years. The Draft Waste Strategy is now complete and was approved at the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee meeting on Tuesday March 1, 2016.


Councillor Information Sessions were held earlier this week to provide an update on how the public will be engaged on the Draft Waste Strategy from March 29, 2016 to April 27, 2016. Attached is the presentation that was delivered at those sessions.


This final phase of the Waste Strategy is pivotal. We are looking for your help to promote the March-April public consultation events and encourage residents to attend an event or take the online survey (survey available from March 29 – April 27, 2016 at www.toronto.ca/wastestrategy). The feedback received through March & April 2016 will help shape the final Waste Strategy that will be presented to Public Works and Infrastructure Committee in June 2016 and City Council in July 2016.


If you are interested in receiving future updates, you may sign up for the electronic mailing list by entering an email address at www.toronto.ca/wastestrategy. Anyone interested in following the project on Twitter may do so @GetInvolvedTO and join the conversation #TOwastestrategy.


For more information, please contact Charlotte Ueta, Acting Manager of Waste Management Planning at 416-392-8506 or  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Reminder to Change Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Batteries


Toronto Fire Services reminds residents that this weekend's start of daylight savings time, when clocks are moved forward one hour, is also a convenient time to replace the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide alarms.


Every home in Ontario must have a working smoke alarm installed on every level and outside all sleeping areas. Working smoke alarms can increase your family’s chance of survival in a fire by providing early warning for escape. Every second counts.


As of April 2015, every home in Ontario with a fuel burning appliance or attached garage must have a working carbon monoxide alarm installed outside all sleeping areas. Working carbon monoxide alarms alert you to the presence of this colourless, odourless, tasteless and potentially deadly gas.


Tips for smoke and carbon monoxide alarms:

  • When installing smoke and carbon monoxide alarms, read the manufacturer’s instructions on correct placement, testing and maintenance.
  • Test smoke and carbon monoxide alarms every month using the test button.
  • Replace smoke and carbon monoxide alarm batteries at least once a year and whenever the low-battery warning chirps.
  • Replace smoke alarms that have been in place for 10 years or longer. Replace carbon monoxide alarms that are seven years and older.
  • Avoid removing the battery in response to a sounding smoke alarm due to cooking or steam. Instead, move the smoke alarm to a better location or use the hush-button feature that will temporarily silence the alarm.
  • Consider installing combination smoke and carbon monoxide alarms with a 10-year lithium battery.


Homeowners are responsible for installing and maintaining smoke and carbon monoxide alarms. Landlords are responsible for ensuring that their rental properties comply with the law. It is against the law for tenants to remove smoke or carbon monoxide alarm batteries or to tamper with the alarms in any way.


Failure to comply with the Ontario Fire Code requirements could, upon conviction, result in a maximum fine of up to $50,000 for individuals, imprisonment, or both, and up to $100,000 for corporations, imprisonment, or both.


More information is available here.


TransformTO Community Conversations


Toronto residents are invited to join a community conversation about climate change and how we can shap Toronto's future as a low-carbon city. The City will host 4 community conversations this spring to build a vision of what Toronto will look like in the year 2050 with drastically reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

Community Conversations:

  • April 25 - Metro Hall (55 John Street)
  • April 27 - Ken Cox Community Centre (28 Colonel Samueal Smith Park Drive, Etobicoke)
  • May 3 - Scarborough Civic Centre (150 Borough Drive)
  • May 9 - North York City Centre, Memorial Hall (5110 Yonge Street)

All events run from 6pm-9pm.

The conversations are part of TransformTO: Climate Action for a Healthy, Equitable, Prosperous Toronto, a City initiative in collaboration with Toronto Atmospheric Fund.

To learn more and register for an event near you, please click here.


Updated Ward 22 Development Page

To ensure you are informed and engaged about development proposals being proposed for sites near your neighbourhood, I've created an interactive webpage.

My Proposed Developments webpage has recently been updated to reflect current development applications and, as always, contains locations, staff reports and public meeting notices. Additionally, the map now shows the boundaries of the Urban Growth Centre surrounding Yonge and Eglinton, as well as the designated Avenues (portions of Eglinton Avenue West, St. Clair Avenue West, Yonge Street, Mt. Pleasant Road and Bayview Avenue). These are all areas where the Province is directing growth. Clicking on any of them will provide links to more information about the ward's Avenues/Urban Growth Centre, as well as links to the City's Official Plan and local secondary plans.

Please click here to learn more about what you can do to help free Toronto from the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB).

For ongoing council and community news, my contact information, along with a calendar of events, please visit www.joshmatlow.caClick here to read my previous city hall and community updates.

A Comprehensive Rapid Transit Plan Moves Forward with a Network Approach

I hope that we are closer than we ever have been before.

As you know, I have strongly advocated for a more honest and comprehensive approach to transit planning in Toronto and the GTHA. I've also challenged plans that made no sense in order to make them better and less costly. For far too long, our city has looked at projects in isolation, and through the cynical lens of self-serving political pursuits, which has led to inaction or, even worse, terrible and expensive decisions.

That’s why I am very pleased that Council has asked Chief Planner Jennifer Keesmaat to continue studying a coordinated, network-approach transit plan that includes:

  • The Relief Line subway
  • SmartTrack
  • Express One Stop Scarborough Subway Extension
  • Eglinton Crosstown East Extension to UofT Scarborough
  • Eglinton Crosstown West Extension to the Airport
  • Waterfront East LRT
  • Waterfront West LRT

While I am actually optimistic that this new approach will lead to better results, I do have several questions. For example, I want to know if there might be cost savings if the revised Scarborough subway follows the route of an existing at-grade corridor that is currently being used for the SRT as both TTC and Metrolinx reports suggest.  My colleagues, including Mayor John Tory, overwhelmingly supported my motion to ask Staff to explore whether it would be possible.

I am very grateful to Mayor Tory for choosing a more evidence-based approach on transit planning and being willing to champion a better plan. I also deeply appreciate the work of our chief planner, along with her tireless and skilled team, who worked around the clock to deliver this plan to Council.

Too many Torontonians have been waiting for too long for a transit plan that makes sense, and can be built ASAP to improve their lives. Our system is already overcrowded on lines such as the Yonge subway through midtown down to Bloor, along streetcar routes such as King and at capacity on routes such as the existing Scarborough RT.

We now need to move forward with a network plan we believe in, and work hard to ensure the funding is in place to see the plan through to fruition.

It is expected that the results of this study will be brought to Council this June. As always, I'll continue to keep you up to date.


Revised Gardiner Hybrid Plan Approved by Council

Last week, Council approved a modified hybrid reconfiguration specifically for the 1.4 km Gardiner East section. The new plan removes one of the ramps and pushes the elevated roadway back from the waterfront at a significant cost.

As I have previously written, I would have preferred the “Boulevard” option. While this new plan allows for a more connected waterfront and opens up more land for development, it will still be direct our limited resources toward serving relatively few people.

The revised hybrid will now cost approximately $500 million more than removing the elevated highway and replacing it with an at-grade boulevard. It will now also demand cars slow down significantly for a portion (due to the turn radias connecting the DVP). However, the construction time will be shorter than the Boulevard option.

For the same cost, the City could have fulfilled a promise to new businesses and residents by moving forward with the Waterfront East LRT, or helped address any one of Toronto’s long list of unfunded capital priorities, including the backlog in social housing repairs or the Relief Subway line.

In total, I believe history will not view this decision kindly. However, I also acknowledge that Council made the best decision based on the options (which discluded the Boulevard) in front of it last week.


New Music Strategy Supported by Council

A new music strategy that hopes to unleash the economic development potential of Toronto’s Music industry, in much the same way the film industry was developed, received unanimous approval from Council. The new plan will promote music-based tourism to our city while looking at better ways to support artists.

There was concern expressed by some residents that approving this initiative would lead to new exemptions for amplified music in City parks. I worked with Councillor Wong-Tam and other colleagues to address these concerns with a motion that referred any proposed noise by-law changes to the Noise by-law review currently being undertaken by Licensing & Standards Committee.


Noise By-Law Review

I deferred the previous proposals by Staff that allowed for a more lax noise by-law. I have been informed that Staff will be bringing an improved set of recommendations to Licensing & Standards Committee this May. I know this is an important issue for many in our community and I will provide further updates when the new report is released. I will certainly continue to do everthing possible to protect the quality of life in our neighbourhoods.


Province Moving in Wrong Direction on Surplus School Properties

It was very timely that Council debated the City’s position on regulations related to school boards selling surplus properties. As part of the province’s Grants for Student Needs funding, the Ministry of Education announced that both the City and other school boards will have to pay full market value for school properties deemed surplus.

This move will make it more difficult to keep public land in public hands. As Chair of the City-School Boards Advisory Committee, I will work with Mayor Tory to advocate for the Toronto’s interests on this issue.


Improving the Response to Infill Construction Sites

Throughout many of our neighbourhoods we are fighting a dramatic increase in inappropriate infill development projects that threaten the fabric and stability of our residential communities. The battles have played out through the Committee of Adjustment and the Ontario Municipal Board, where they often are approved and residents are then forced to start the next fight – the construction process.

When these new homes are built, it is incredibly disruptive to local residents, as they are being built right in the heart of residential neighbourhoods and the impacts are literally in people’s front yards. Often, contractors will work beyond permitted noise bylaw hours, they take over on-street parking, and block the public right of way. Of particular concern is the excessive noise and dust from stone and rock cutting performed on site, which is disruptive and hazardous for immediate neighbours. On some streets there are several of these projects occurring simultaneously, and once one job is completed another begins.

I have been working with several residents to help mitigate the impacts these infill construction sites have on the local community and last week City Council approved a strategy to help address this issue.

The City’s strategy aims to:

  • Improve the complaint management strategy to manage and respond to complaints more quickly;
  • Improve communication with residents to provide clear, understandable information so that issues can be resolved in a more timely manner;
  • Encourage good construction practices in the building industry through education, more effective enforcement, increased use of tickets, and an additional mandatory inspection and increased building inspector knowledge.

City Council also directed the Executive Director of Municipal Licensing and Standards to work in consultation with Toronto Buildings, The Energy and Environment Office and Toronto Public Health to come back to City Council in 2017 with recommendations on dust control measures related to infill construction.

For your review, here is the report that was approved at City Council last week.


Further Progress for Creating a Made-for-Toronto Local Appeal Body (LAB)

Last week, Council approved the implementation of a (LAB) for the City after a follow-up report from February 2016. Three out of the five motions were approved and can be viewed here. The background for this decision comes from the Province of Ontario granting the City of Toronto the power to establish a LAB, to hear "appeals" of Committee of Adjustment decisions on both minor variances and consent applications.

While this is a better process, I look forward to seeing more details as the LAB begins to take shape. This LAB will be arms-length from Council and completely independent.

In was clear to me that this is not an initiative City Staff would've proposed themselves, based on their responses at Council. I also do have some concerns about the downloading of costs to the City for the appeals work from the Province.

That being said, the Province currently only allows Toronto to create a local body to hear minor variances appeals, not on large-scale development projects. They have said at various times that Toronto must move forward with this LAB before they will seriously consider freeing us from the OMB. Therefore, I believe its a necessary step we must take.

We now need to continue advocating to completely free Toronto from the OMB's purview with regard to other impactful planning decisions, such as large-scale development in our communities.


Ontario extending funding to Paramedicine Programs for Seniors!
As Toronto's Seniors Advocate, I recently met with Ontario's Minister Responsible for Seniors, Mario Sergio, to discuss a wide array of priorities to Toronto's seniors including the import and convenience of these programs to many seniors and how these programs can contribute to lessening demand on 911, hospital waiting rooms and emergency services.
Please read today's article about the Province's wonderful and helpful announcement. Thank you especially to Dr. Samir Sinha, Minister Mario Sergio and Minister Eric Hoskins for your advocacy and action.

New Solar Panel on Local EMS Station Will Reduce CO2 and Create Revenue
Shifting to renewable power is one important measure that cities can take to help cut CO2. As a School Trustee I helped to initiate the Green Grid program which uses solar panels to create clean energy and teach kids about environmental stewardship. As your City Councillor, I am proud to be involved in a similar program that uses City facilities to reduce our reliance on the traditional energy grid while creating additional revenue for the City.

In Ward 22, a new solar panel has just been installed on the roof of EMS Station 18 at 643 Eglinton Avenue West. The 10 kilowatt panel generates about 11,000 kilowatt hours of clean electricity per year, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by about 500 kilograms annually. This project will generate $80,000 in revenue for the City over its 20 year lifespan through the sale of electricity to the Province under a micro Feed-in Tariff contract.

Increasing the use of renewable energy is only one change that cities can make to reduce greenhouse gases. Expanding public transit, designing more compact, walkable neighbourhoods and planting more trees can also significantly reduce our environmental footprint while improving our quality of life and the economy.

To learn more about what local governments around the world are doing to improve the environment, please click here.


Ward 22's Davisville Village Farmers’ Market opens for another season!


AppleTree Markets, a local Ward 22 non-profit organization, will once again be transforming June Rowlands Park into a temporary town square for the fifth year of their popular farmers’ market. I am delighted to support this community-building initiative at June Rowlands (Davsiville) Park. The market has been a place where you are sure to see friends and neighbours, while buying fresh produce, fish, meats, chocolate, and so much more.


This season, the market begins on May 10 and will operate weekly on Tuesdays between 3 and 7pm. I look forward to seeing you there!


Improving the Midtown Yonge Streetscape and Supporting Small Business

 

With the Yonge station set to open at the intersection of Yonge and Eglinton in 2020, it is imperative that the local BIA start developing a unified streetscape design as soon as possible.

 

That's why I moved a motion to provide the Midtown Yonge BIA with $47,500, fully funded by Section 37 community benefits, to design a Streetscape Masterplan that will start the process of adding new trees, street furniture and other enhancements in the coming years.

 

This plan will help improve the walkability and attractiveness of the street which will, in turn, help attract new businesses to the neighbourhood.

 

Please feel welcome to attend the upcoming open house, to review and provide feedback on the current proposal with PLANT ARCHITECT Inc, the BIA Board of Management and staff from the City's BIA Office.The meeting will be held from 5pm to 9pm on Tuesday, April 19 at Grano (2035 Yonge Street).

 


Lionel Conacher Park Splash Pad Public Meeting

Please join me on Wednesday, April 27, 2016 at 7pm to discuss an exciting, new children's splash pad for Lionel Conacher Park.

 

The meeting will take place in the Gymnasium at Cottingham Junior Public School (85 Birch Avenue) and will give you a chance to review the new splash pad design with myself and Parks, Forestry & Recreation staff. I hope to see you there!


St. Clair Avenue West Mural Project

The award-winning public arts organization STEPS, responsible for the World’s Tallest Mural at Sherbourne and Wellesley is teaming up with Slate Asset Management and celebrated international artist PHLEGM to create a 12-storey mural at 1 St. Clair Avenue West.

As part of STEPS' consultation process, they are conducting a survey to gather resident feedback to help inform the mural's design. To access the survey and learn more about this project, please click here.


Growing Up: Planning for Children in New Vertical Communities
City Planning has initiated a study entitled Growing Up: Planning for Children in New Vertical Communities.  The study seeks to examine how families with children and youth can be better accommodated in mid and high-rise neighbourhoods – the fastest growing building type in the city. The objective of the study is to ensure that families with kids, both present and future, are provided with the opportunity to grow up and thrive in higher density housing.

This study follows up on a number of City Planning initiatives to encourage family friendly developments including the deferred 2010 draft OPA to require 3 bedroom units in new developments, the Condominium Consultations and the Chief Planner's Roundtable on Planning Cities for Families. The study will address both the quantity and quality of new housing by exploring the needs of families at three scales (the unit, the building and the neighbourhood) and result in new Official Plan policies and a Handbook containing performance standards and guidelines.

The study website has been updated to include the study approach which explains the work being undertaken in each of the three phases.  An overview of the consultation approach which lists all of the consultation activities that will be undertaken throughout the course of the study is attached.  You may also be interested in reviewing demographic profiles of households with children in each of our seven study areas: the Downtown and Centres (Etobicoke, North York, Yonge Eglinton, and Scarborough Civic Centres) as identified on Map 2 Urban Structure as well as two additional areas – Humber Bay Shores and the Sheppard Corridor.

As part of the first phase of the study, we have launched an online survey to learn about the experiences of families raising children in mid and high-rise buildings.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss further, feel free to contact Ann-Marie Nasr, Manager, SIPA,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 416-392-3078.


24-Hour Client Care Centre Number for Toronto Community Housing (TCHC) Residents

Following a recent meeting I conducted with residents and staff from TCHC, it was brought to my attention that a very useful, yet under-utilized resource exists to assist tenants in accessing important requests. TCHC tenants can speak with a client care representative 24/7 for emergency and routine maintenance requests, questions about rent or leases, requests to transfer to a different unit, information about how to add or remove someone from a lease, or many other matters pertaining to your tenancy.

The system operates similarly to Toronto's 311 service, whereby each request is processed efficiently and assigned a unique reference number the caller can follow up on.

TCHC Client Care can be reached at 416-981-5500.

For information on a number of other important contact numbers for TCHC tenants, please click here.


Public consultations on the recommendations from the Mayor's Task Force on Toronto Community Housing

Toronto Community Housing tenants are invited to public meetings regarding the recommendations made in the final report of the Mayor’s Task Force on Toronto Community Housing. The meetings will be an opportunity for tenants to hear about the recommendations and share their views regarding how the City should move forward on the Task Force recommendations.

Please click here for a complete list of meeting dates and locations between April 11th to 25th.


The Probus Club Wants You!


THE PROBUS CLUB of TORONTO welcomes PROfessional BUSiness men and women who have retired from their jobs or businesses and want to maintain a social network with others who have similar interests. The club meets on the 2nd Wednesday of each month from 10am to 12pm in the Holy Rosary Parish Hall, 356 St. Clair Ave. West.

 

For more information on joining the Probus Club of Toronto, please e-mail  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Access, Equity and Human Rights Awards Nominations Now Open
Do you know someone or a community group who is making a difference in Toronto by reducing barriers to civic participation? Celebrate their accomplishments – nominate them for an award!

The City's Access, Equity and Human Rights Awards recognize significant efforts of Toronto residents who are working to build a city in which all residents are full and equal participants in the social, cultural, economic, recreational and political life of the city. Each year, the City celebrates the contributions made by nominated residents or groups at an awards ceremony held in December.

Deadline for submitting nominations is Monday, May 2, 2016.

Nominees must be residents of the City of Toronto. To nominate and for more information including past recipients, please click here.


City of Toronto Long-Term Waste Management Strategy - Next Steps
Solid Waste Management Services is undertaking the development of a Long Term Waste Management Strategy ("Waste Strategy") to guide decision making on how the City's waste will be managed over the next 30 to 50 years. The Draft Waste Strategy is now complete and was approved at the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee meeting on Tuesday March 1, 2016.

Councillor Information Sessions were held earlier this week to provide an update on how the public will be engaged on the Draft Waste Strategy from March 29, 2016 to April 27, 2016. Attached is the presentation that was delivered at those sessions.

This final phase of the Waste Strategy is pivotal. We are looking for your help to promote the March-April public consultation events and encourage residents to attend an event or take the online survey (survey available from March 29 – April 27, 2016 at www.toronto.ca/wastestrategy). The feedback received through March & April 2016 will help shape the final Waste Strategy that will be presented to Public Works and Infrastructure Committee in June 2016 and City Council in July 2016.

If you are interested in receiving future updates, you may sign up for the electronic mailing list by entering an email address at www.toronto.ca/wastestrategy. Anyone interested in following the project on Twitter may do so @GetInvolvedTO and join the conversation #TOwastestrategy.

For more information, please contact Charlotte Ueta, Acting Manager of Waste Management Planning at 416-392-8506 or  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Reminder to Change Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Batteries

Toronto Fire Services reminds residents that this weekend's start of daylight savings time, when clocks are moved forward one hour, is also a convenient time to replace the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide alarms.

Every home in Ontario must have a working smoke alarm installed on every level and outside all sleeping areas. Working smoke alarms can increase your family’s chance of survival in a fire by providing early warning for escape. Every second counts.

As of April 2015, every home in Ontario with a fuel burning appliance or attached garage must have a working carbon monoxide alarm installed outside all sleeping areas. Working carbon monoxide alarms alert you to the presence of this colourless, odourless, tasteless and potentially deadly gas.

Tips for smoke and carbon monoxide alarms:

  • When installing smoke and carbon monoxide alarms, read the manufacturer’s instructions on correct placement, testing and maintenance.
  • Test smoke and carbon monoxide alarms every month using the test button.
  • Replace smoke and carbon monoxide alarm batteries at least once a year and whenever the low-battery warning chirps.
  • Replace smoke alarms that have been in place for 10 years or longer. Replace carbon monoxide alarms that are seven years and older.
  • Avoid removing the battery in response to a sounding smoke alarm due to cooking or steam. Instead, move the smoke alarm to a better location or use the hush-button feature that will temporarily silence the alarm.
  • Consider installing combination smoke and carbon monoxide alarms with a 10-year lithium battery.

Homeowners are responsible for installing and maintaining smoke and carbon monoxide alarms. Landlords are responsible for ensuring that their rental properties comply with the law. It is against the law for tenants to remove smoke or carbon monoxide alarm batteries or to tamper with the alarms in any way.

Failure to comply with the Ontario Fire Code requirements could, upon conviction, result in a maximum fine of up to $50,000 for individuals, imprisonment, or both, and up to $100,000 for corporations, imprisonment, or both.

More information is available here.


TransformTO Community Conversations

Toronto residents are invited to join a community conversation about climate change and how we can shap Toronto's future as a low-carbon city. The City will host 4 community conversations this spring to build a vision of what Toronto will look like in the year 2050 with drastically reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

Community Conversations:

  • April 25 - Metro Hall (55 John Street)
  • April 27 - Ken Cox Community Centre (28 Colonel Samueal Smith Park Drive, Etobicoke)
  • May 3 - Scarborough Civic Centre (150 Borough Drive)
  • May 9 - North York City Centre, Memorial Hall (5110 Yonge Street)

All events run from 6pm-9pm,

The concversations are part of TransformTO: CLimate Action for a Healthy, Equitable, Prosperous Toronto, a City initiative in collaboration with Toronto Atmospheric Fund.

To learn more and register for an event near you, please click here.


Updated Ward 22 Development Page
To ensure you are informed and engaged about development proposals being proposed for sites near your neighbourhood, I've created an interactive webpage.
My Proposed Developments webpage has recently been updated to reflect current development applications and, as always, contains locations, staff reports and public meeting notices. Additionally, the map now shows the boundaries of the Urban Growth Centre surrounding Yonge and Eglinton, as well as the designated Avenues (portions of Eglinton Avenue West, St. Clair Avenue West, Yonge Street, Mt. Pleasant Road and Bayview Avenue). These are all areas where the Province is directing growth. Clicking on any of them will provide links to more information about the ward's Avenues/Urban Growth Centre, as well as links to the City's Official Plan and local secondary plans.
Please click here to learn more about what you can do to help free Toronto from the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB).

For ongoing council and community news, my contact information, along with a calendar of events, please visit www.joshmatlow.caClick here to read my previous city hall and community updates.

   

Preliminary Discussion Points Concerning New transit Network Modelling

The transit network modelled in EX 13.3 is not the network that will ultimately be before Executive Committee in June. However, UofT (on behalf of the City) will be using the same model to project the network that Council will be asked to support. In that context, there are a number of results from the model presented as an appendix to EX13.33 that are concerning. Based on my preliminary reading of the materials, the following are a few reasonable discussion points as we move forward:

 

  • Scarborough subway (McCowan with 3 stops and without Smart Track) has an AM peak hour ridership of 13,700 westbound into Kennedy

 

  • Relief Line (Pape via Queen- most likely scenario according to the Chief Planner- without SmartTrack) has an AM peak hour ridership of 12,500

 

  • Staff have provided the reason for this being that there will be significant ridership from buses that would feed into a Scarborough subway, while Relief Line riders would have a larger network, and therefore more options, to rely upon

 

Yet……

 

  • The Scarborough subway in the 3 stop McCowan alignment goes from 13,700 to 12,600 riders in the AM Peak hour with 15 minute SmartTrack, a loss of 1,100 riders

 

  • The Relief Line goes from 12,500 to 11,600 riders in the same scenario, a loss of 900 riders. Despite the larger number of transit options available to downtown users, that supposedly accounts for the lower ridership on the Relief Line, the sensitivity on the line is about the same as for the Scarborough subway.

 

  • The McCowan 4 stop subway, was projected to have 17,400 AM Peak Hour riders without SmartTrack

 

  • In 2012, the TTCs Downtown Rapid Transit Study found that the Southbound am peak hour ridership for the University-Spadina subway is 19,300.

 

  • If we put the peak point at, say, between Museum and Queen's Park before the government workers and students get off and you're probably not picking up a ton more riders at that point....that's accumulated ridership from 9 stops- with all the surface routes that feed into them, plus whatever feeds in from Downsview, and all the riders coming from the Bloor-Danforth line to the busiest employment areas in the whole country
    • The large government complex, several huge hospitals, UofT, the financial district

 

  • How is it remotely possible that four stops in Scarborough would accumulate a similar amount of ridership heading into Kennedy station?
   

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